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History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

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Ross Granville Harrison (1870-1959). Bronson Professor of Comparative Anatomy, Professor of Embryology, Sterling Professor of Biology, Chairman of the Department of Zoology, 1907-1938.
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Figure 8: Ross Granville Harrison (1870-1959). Bronson Professor of Comparative Anatomy, Professor of Embryology, Sterling Professor of Biology, Chairman of the Department of Zoology, 1907-1938.

Mentions: Ross Granville Harrison (1870-1959) [15] (Figure 8) received an AB degree from Johns Hopkins in 1889 and a PhD in 1894. In 1892-93, he worked with Moritz Nussbaum at the University of Bonn. After receiving his PhD, he returned to Bonn and received an MD degree in 1899. He became an instructor in the new Johns Hopkins Medical School. He taught histology and embryology from 1896-1907 and was Associate Professor of Anatomy from 1899-1907, when he came to Yale as Bronson Professor of Comparative Anatomy. He was active in the medical school and held the title of Professor of Embryology. He moved into the new Osborn Laboratory, where he had a research laboratory and taught embryology. He was Chairman of the Department of Zoology from 1913 to 1938 and Sterling Professor of Biology from 1927 to 1938. He maintained an influential relationship to medicine on a national scale. He advised Abraham Flexner and Simon Flexner, director of the Rockefeller Institute, during the crusade to improve medical training. After retiring from Yale, he was Chairman of the National Research Council from 1938 to 1946. His decisions formed the basis of some of our national science policy during World War II and in the critical days of atomic development. The production of penicillin in large quantities in this country was arranged through channels that had their origin with Harrison.


History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Ross Granville Harrison (1870-1959). Bronson Professor of Comparative Anatomy, Professor of Embryology, Sterling Professor of Biology, Chairman of the Department of Zoology, 1907-1938.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117420&req=5

Figure 8: Ross Granville Harrison (1870-1959). Bronson Professor of Comparative Anatomy, Professor of Embryology, Sterling Professor of Biology, Chairman of the Department of Zoology, 1907-1938.
Mentions: Ross Granville Harrison (1870-1959) [15] (Figure 8) received an AB degree from Johns Hopkins in 1889 and a PhD in 1894. In 1892-93, he worked with Moritz Nussbaum at the University of Bonn. After receiving his PhD, he returned to Bonn and received an MD degree in 1899. He became an instructor in the new Johns Hopkins Medical School. He taught histology and embryology from 1896-1907 and was Associate Professor of Anatomy from 1899-1907, when he came to Yale as Bronson Professor of Comparative Anatomy. He was active in the medical school and held the title of Professor of Embryology. He moved into the new Osborn Laboratory, where he had a research laboratory and taught embryology. He was Chairman of the Department of Zoology from 1913 to 1938 and Sterling Professor of Biology from 1927 to 1938. He maintained an influential relationship to medicine on a national scale. He advised Abraham Flexner and Simon Flexner, director of the Rockefeller Institute, during the crusade to improve medical training. After retiring from Yale, he was Chairman of the National Research Council from 1938 to 1946. His decisions formed the basis of some of our national science policy during World War II and in the critical days of atomic development. The production of penicillin in large quantities in this country was arranged through channels that had their origin with Harrison.

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

Show MeSH