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History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

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Jonathan Knight (1789-1864). Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, Professor of Surgery, 1813-1864.2
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Figure 1: Jonathan Knight (1789-1864). Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, Professor of Surgery, 1813-1864.2

Mentions: The predecessor of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale was the Department of Anatomy, which has a history going back to the beginning of the School of Medicine. The School of Medicine was established by the passage of a bill in the Connecticut General Assembly in 1810 granting a charter for “The Medical Institution of Yale College” [1,2]. The institution was formally opened in 1813 with 37 students, and the first degrees were conferred the following year. In 1814, $1,000 was spent for a library and an anatomical museum. One of the five original faculty members of the school was Jonathan Knight, MD (1789-1864) [2] (Figure 1). Knight graduated from Yale College in 1808 and received his medical license in 1811. He then attended two courses at the University of Pennsylvania, studying anatomy with Caspar Wistar, under whose guidance he purchased anatomical teaching materials for use in the medical school at Yale. Cadavers for dissection were difficult to obtain, and citizens of New Haven rioted in 1824 when the body of a young woman that had been missing from her grave in the Grove Street Cemetery was found buried in the basement of the medical school [1]. Knight was Professor of Anatomy and Physiology from 1813 to 1838 and Professor of Surgery from 1838 to 1864.1


History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Jonathan Knight (1789-1864). Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, Professor of Surgery, 1813-1864.2
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117420&req=5

Figure 1: Jonathan Knight (1789-1864). Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, Professor of Surgery, 1813-1864.2
Mentions: The predecessor of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale was the Department of Anatomy, which has a history going back to the beginning of the School of Medicine. The School of Medicine was established by the passage of a bill in the Connecticut General Assembly in 1810 granting a charter for “The Medical Institution of Yale College” [1,2]. The institution was formally opened in 1813 with 37 students, and the first degrees were conferred the following year. In 1814, $1,000 was spent for a library and an anatomical museum. One of the five original faculty members of the school was Jonathan Knight, MD (1789-1864) [2] (Figure 1). Knight graduated from Yale College in 1808 and received his medical license in 1811. He then attended two courses at the University of Pennsylvania, studying anatomy with Caspar Wistar, under whose guidance he purchased anatomical teaching materials for use in the medical school at Yale. Cadavers for dissection were difficult to obtain, and citizens of New Haven rioted in 1824 when the body of a young woman that had been missing from her grave in the Grove Street Cemetery was found buried in the basement of the medical school [1]. Knight was Professor of Anatomy and Physiology from 1813 to 1838 and Professor of Surgery from 1838 to 1864.1

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

Show MeSH