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Toward a modern synthesis of immunity: Charles A. Janeway Jr. and the immunologist's dirty little secret.

Gayed PM - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: This essay chronicles the major theoretical and experimental contributions made by Charles A.Janeway, Jr. (1943-2003), Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Yale Professor of Immunobiology, who established the fundamental role of the innate immune system in the induction of the adaptive arm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Immunobiology Department, Yale School of Medicine, 367 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. peter.gayed@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
This essay chronicles the major theoretical and experimental contributions made by Charles A. Janeway, Jr. (1943-2003), Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Yale Professor of Immunobiology, who established the fundamental role of the innate immune system in the induction of the adaptive arm.

Show MeSH
Simultaneous engagement of the TCR with its cognate antigen (red circle) and of the B7 molecule with its receptor (CD28) respectively provide the first and second signals required for T cell activation.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Simultaneous engagement of the TCR with its cognate antigen (red circle) and of the B7 molecule with its receptor (CD28) respectively provide the first and second signals required for T cell activation.

Mentions: Thus, Janeway, supported by studies from independent groups, had demonstrated that antigen alone was insufficient to trigger the adaptive system. A second signal, which could be provided by B cells or macrophages, was required — and, critically, this signal was only made available after treatment with microbial products such as LPS or zymosan. It would become clear that the second signal, in this case, was provided by two closely related members of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, B7.1 (CD80) and B7.2 (CD86)1. The B7 molecules are expressed by B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells — collectively known as the antigen presenting cells of the immune system — but only after their exposure to microbial products (Figures 1 and 2). Thus, the first of Janeway’s two-part theory on the induction of the adaptive arm had been borne out. Not yet identified, however, was the receptor by which microbial products were recognized. Impressively, this, too, would come from the Janeway lab.


Toward a modern synthesis of immunity: Charles A. Janeway Jr. and the immunologist's dirty little secret.

Gayed PM - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Simultaneous engagement of the TCR with its cognate antigen (red circle) and of the B7 molecule with its receptor (CD28) respectively provide the first and second signals required for T cell activation.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117407&req=5

Figure 1: Simultaneous engagement of the TCR with its cognate antigen (red circle) and of the B7 molecule with its receptor (CD28) respectively provide the first and second signals required for T cell activation.
Mentions: Thus, Janeway, supported by studies from independent groups, had demonstrated that antigen alone was insufficient to trigger the adaptive system. A second signal, which could be provided by B cells or macrophages, was required — and, critically, this signal was only made available after treatment with microbial products such as LPS or zymosan. It would become clear that the second signal, in this case, was provided by two closely related members of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, B7.1 (CD80) and B7.2 (CD86)1. The B7 molecules are expressed by B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells — collectively known as the antigen presenting cells of the immune system — but only after their exposure to microbial products (Figures 1 and 2). Thus, the first of Janeway’s two-part theory on the induction of the adaptive arm had been borne out. Not yet identified, however, was the receptor by which microbial products were recognized. Impressively, this, too, would come from the Janeway lab.

Bottom Line: This essay chronicles the major theoretical and experimental contributions made by Charles A.Janeway, Jr. (1943-2003), Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Yale Professor of Immunobiology, who established the fundamental role of the innate immune system in the induction of the adaptive arm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Immunobiology Department, Yale School of Medicine, 367 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. peter.gayed@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
This essay chronicles the major theoretical and experimental contributions made by Charles A. Janeway, Jr. (1943-2003), Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Yale Professor of Immunobiology, who established the fundamental role of the innate immune system in the induction of the adaptive arm.

Show MeSH