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The legacy of a founding father of modern cell biology: George Emil Palade (1912-2008).

Zorca SM, Zorca CE - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: George Emil Palade's scientific contributions significantly advanced the field of modern cell biology.For these accomplishments, Palade, along with Albert Claude and Christian de Duve, won the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.This article provides an overview of Palade's seminal research in the context of the early developments in the field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Yale-New Haven Hospital, 300 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. cornelia.zorca@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
George Emil Palade's scientific contributions significantly advanced the field of modern cell biology. He pioneered a multidisciplinary approach, combining cell fractionation, biochemistry, and electron microscopy, which led to the identification of the ribosome as the site of protein synthesis and elucidated the eukaryotic secretory pathway. For these accomplishments, Palade, along with Albert Claude and Christian de Duve, won the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. This article provides an overview of Palade's seminal research in the context of the early developments in the field.

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Dr. George Palade. 1974 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine. Photograph courtesy of Dr. James D. Jamieson
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Figure 1: Dr. George Palade. 1974 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine. Photograph courtesy of Dr. James D. Jamieson

Mentions: George Emil Palade (Figure 1) was born in Iasi, Romania, in 1912 and was the son of a philosophy professor and an educator. Early in his life, he chose to pursue medicine because of its focus on the “tangibles and specifics” [1] of physiology and the scientific method. However, his interests were remarkably diverse, and he inherited a deep-seated respect for philosophy and rational inquiry from his early upbringing. At the age of 18, he matriculated at the University of Medicine of Bucharest and in 1940 completed his doctoral thesis on the “microscopic anatomy” of the dolphin nephron [1]. In studying this unique topic, he developed an understanding of the functional adaptation of mammals to marine life. This early academic work occurred during the politically tense years leading up to World War II. Recalling the social and political turmoil sweeping through Europe in the pre-war era, Palade noted, “. . . the continent was torn apart by all kinds of ideological movements. This state of insecurity had [a] significant impact during my studies” [2]. The young Palade served in the medical corps of the Romanian Army. Upon his return from the war, he became a faculty member of the Institute of Anatomy at his alma mater and remained there until 1946.


The legacy of a founding father of modern cell biology: George Emil Palade (1912-2008).

Zorca SM, Zorca CE - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Dr. George Palade. 1974 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine. Photograph courtesy of Dr. James D. Jamieson
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117404&req=5

Figure 1: Dr. George Palade. 1974 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine. Photograph courtesy of Dr. James D. Jamieson
Mentions: George Emil Palade (Figure 1) was born in Iasi, Romania, in 1912 and was the son of a philosophy professor and an educator. Early in his life, he chose to pursue medicine because of its focus on the “tangibles and specifics” [1] of physiology and the scientific method. However, his interests were remarkably diverse, and he inherited a deep-seated respect for philosophy and rational inquiry from his early upbringing. At the age of 18, he matriculated at the University of Medicine of Bucharest and in 1940 completed his doctoral thesis on the “microscopic anatomy” of the dolphin nephron [1]. In studying this unique topic, he developed an understanding of the functional adaptation of mammals to marine life. This early academic work occurred during the politically tense years leading up to World War II. Recalling the social and political turmoil sweeping through Europe in the pre-war era, Palade noted, “. . . the continent was torn apart by all kinds of ideological movements. This state of insecurity had [a] significant impact during my studies” [2]. The young Palade served in the medical corps of the Romanian Army. Upon his return from the war, he became a faculty member of the Institute of Anatomy at his alma mater and remained there until 1946.

Bottom Line: George Emil Palade's scientific contributions significantly advanced the field of modern cell biology.For these accomplishments, Palade, along with Albert Claude and Christian de Duve, won the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.This article provides an overview of Palade's seminal research in the context of the early developments in the field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Yale-New Haven Hospital, 300 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. cornelia.zorca@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
George Emil Palade's scientific contributions significantly advanced the field of modern cell biology. He pioneered a multidisciplinary approach, combining cell fractionation, biochemistry, and electron microscopy, which led to the identification of the ribosome as the site of protein synthesis and elucidated the eukaryotic secretory pathway. For these accomplishments, Palade, along with Albert Claude and Christian de Duve, won the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. This article provides an overview of Palade's seminal research in the context of the early developments in the field.

Show MeSH