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Role of imaging in the management of neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

Gandhi RA, Nair AG - Indian J Ophthalmol (2011 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging.A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision.This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sankara Nethralaya, A Unit of Medical Research Foundation, Chennai - 600 006, Tamil Nadu, India. rashmin70@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging. A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision. This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Left: Axial T1 weighted image showing the normal optic nerve and the characteristic hyperintense appearing orbital fat surrounding it. Right: Axial T2 FSE (Fast Spin Echo) image depicting the normal optic nerve. Note the bright hyperintense cerebrospinal fluid
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Figure 0005: Left: Axial T1 weighted image showing the normal optic nerve and the characteristic hyperintense appearing orbital fat surrounding it. Right: Axial T2 FSE (Fast Spin Echo) image depicting the normal optic nerve. Note the bright hyperintense cerebrospinal fluid

Mentions: It may help the uninitiated ophthalmologist to remember that fat appears bright in T1 images (hyperintense) and CSF appears hyperintense in T2 images [Fig. 5].


Role of imaging in the management of neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

Gandhi RA, Nair AG - Indian J Ophthalmol (2011 Mar-Apr)

Left: Axial T1 weighted image showing the normal optic nerve and the characteristic hyperintense appearing orbital fat surrounding it. Right: Axial T2 FSE (Fast Spin Echo) image depicting the normal optic nerve. Note the bright hyperintense cerebrospinal fluid
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116539&req=5

Figure 0005: Left: Axial T1 weighted image showing the normal optic nerve and the characteristic hyperintense appearing orbital fat surrounding it. Right: Axial T2 FSE (Fast Spin Echo) image depicting the normal optic nerve. Note the bright hyperintense cerebrospinal fluid
Mentions: It may help the uninitiated ophthalmologist to remember that fat appears bright in T1 images (hyperintense) and CSF appears hyperintense in T2 images [Fig. 5].

Bottom Line: Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging.A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision.This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sankara Nethralaya, A Unit of Medical Research Foundation, Chennai - 600 006, Tamil Nadu, India. rashmin70@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging. A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision. This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus