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Role of imaging in the management of neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

Gandhi RA, Nair AG - Indian J Ophthalmol (2011 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging.A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision.This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sankara Nethralaya, A Unit of Medical Research Foundation, Chennai - 600 006, Tamil Nadu, India. rashmin70@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging. A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision. This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Left: Axial T2 FLAIR image at the level of the lateral venticles showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions, suggestive of Multiple Sclerosis. Right: Para sagittal T2 FLAIR image showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions perpendicular to the lateral ventricles, also known as Dawsons fingers
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Figure 0003: Left: Axial T2 FLAIR image at the level of the lateral venticles showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions, suggestive of Multiple Sclerosis. Right: Para sagittal T2 FLAIR image showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions perpendicular to the lateral ventricles, also known as Dawsons fingers

Mentions: The role of MRI is vital in cases of demyelinating optic neuritis. It is equally important in evaluating the potential risk of future demyelinating events and multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic neuritis study group, after a 15-year follow-up, has shown that patients with optic neuritis and no white matter lesions on initial MRI had a 25% risk of developing MS, while those with one or more lesions had a 72% risk [Fig. 3].[34]


Role of imaging in the management of neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

Gandhi RA, Nair AG - Indian J Ophthalmol (2011 Mar-Apr)

Left: Axial T2 FLAIR image at the level of the lateral venticles showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions, suggestive of Multiple Sclerosis. Right: Para sagittal T2 FLAIR image showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions perpendicular to the lateral ventricles, also known as Dawsons fingers
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116539&req=5

Figure 0003: Left: Axial T2 FLAIR image at the level of the lateral venticles showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions, suggestive of Multiple Sclerosis. Right: Para sagittal T2 FLAIR image showing multiple hyperintense periventricular white lesions perpendicular to the lateral ventricles, also known as Dawsons fingers
Mentions: The role of MRI is vital in cases of demyelinating optic neuritis. It is equally important in evaluating the potential risk of future demyelinating events and multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic neuritis study group, after a 15-year follow-up, has shown that patients with optic neuritis and no white matter lesions on initial MRI had a 25% risk of developing MS, while those with one or more lesions had a 72% risk [Fig. 3].[34]

Bottom Line: Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging.A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision.This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sankara Nethralaya, A Unit of Medical Research Foundation, Chennai - 600 006, Tamil Nadu, India. rashmin70@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Advancements in physics, computers, and imaging science in the last century have seen neuro-imaging evolving from a plain X-ray to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging scans, noninvasive angiography, and special sequences such as fat suppression, fluid attenuation recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging. A prompt prescription of an appropriate imaging modality and the most suitable sequence can increase the diagnostic yield, and in many instances, it can be a sight-saving and even a life-saving decision. This article discusses basic principles of neuro-imaging, its common indications, and the appropriate application in an ophthalmology practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus