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Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus.

Sun Y, Sun S, Li W, Li B, Li J - Virol. J. (2011)

Bottom Line: For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in which viral infections was included.There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001); significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p < 0.001).We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1).Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Clinical Laboratories, Beijing Hospital, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE.

Results: In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108) with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122) were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA). There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001); significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p < 0.001).We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1). Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625).

Conclusion: Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Positive samples for HHV8. A: Amplification of β-actin (304 bp), B: the first round PCR (233 bp), C: the second round PCR (195 bp). Lane N: negative control, Lane H: positive sample of healthy controls, Lane 1-11: positive samples of patients with SLE, Lane P: positive control.
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Figure 2: Positive samples for HHV8. A: Amplification of β-actin (304 bp), B: the first round PCR (233 bp), C: the second round PCR (195 bp). Lane N: negative control, Lane H: positive sample of healthy controls, Lane 1-11: positive samples of patients with SLE, Lane P: positive control.

Mentions: DNA isolated from sera was used as template to screen for target sequence. Of the 107 patients with SLE, 11 (10.3%) were determined positive for HHV-8 ORF26; whereas in healthy controls, 1/122 (0.8%) was positive. The results between those two groups was statistically different (p = 0.001, by χ2 test). All the repeat testing for positive samples showed consistent results (Figure 2). DNA sequence assay for positive PCR products showed expected results for HHV-8 ORF26 sequences.


Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus.

Sun Y, Sun S, Li W, Li B, Li J - Virol. J. (2011)

Positive samples for HHV8. A: Amplification of β-actin (304 bp), B: the first round PCR (233 bp), C: the second round PCR (195 bp). Lane N: negative control, Lane H: positive sample of healthy controls, Lane 1-11: positive samples of patients with SLE, Lane P: positive control.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116491&req=5

Figure 2: Positive samples for HHV8. A: Amplification of β-actin (304 bp), B: the first round PCR (233 bp), C: the second round PCR (195 bp). Lane N: negative control, Lane H: positive sample of healthy controls, Lane 1-11: positive samples of patients with SLE, Lane P: positive control.
Mentions: DNA isolated from sera was used as template to screen for target sequence. Of the 107 patients with SLE, 11 (10.3%) were determined positive for HHV-8 ORF26; whereas in healthy controls, 1/122 (0.8%) was positive. The results between those two groups was statistically different (p = 0.001, by χ2 test). All the repeat testing for positive samples showed consistent results (Figure 2). DNA sequence assay for positive PCR products showed expected results for HHV-8 ORF26 sequences.

Bottom Line: For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in which viral infections was included.There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001); significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p < 0.001).We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1).Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Clinical Laboratories, Beijing Hospital, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE.

Results: In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108) with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122) were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA). There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001); significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p < 0.001).We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1). Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625).

Conclusion: Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus