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Nanomedicine: application areas and development prospects.

Boulaiz H, Alvarez PJ, Ramirez A, Marchal JA, Prados J, Rodríguez-Serrano F, Perán M, Melguizo C, Aranega A - Int J Mol Sci (2011)

Bottom Line: In nanomedicine, atoms and molecules are manipulated to produce nanostructures of the same size as biomolecules for interaction with human cells.This procedure offers a range of new solutions for diagnoses and "smart" treatments by stimulating the body's own repair mechanisms.Preventive medicine may then become a reality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER), School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada 18071, Spain; E-Mails: pablo.alvarez.exts@juntadeandalucia.es (P.J.A.); alrari80@gmail.com (A.R.); jmarchal@ugr.es (J.A.M.); jcpradois@ugr.es (J.P.); fernrs@ugr.es (F.R.-S.); melguizo@ugr.es (C.M.).

ABSTRACT
Nanotechnology, along with related concepts such as nanomaterials, nanostructures and nanoparticles, has become a priority area for scientific research and technological development. Nanotechnology, i.e., the creation and utilization of materials and devices at nanometer scale, already has multiple applications in electronics and other fields. However, the greatest expectations are for its application in biotechnology and health, with the direct impact these could have on the quality of health in future societies. The emerging discipline of nanomedicine brings nanotechnology and medicine together in order to develop novel therapies and improve existing treatments. In nanomedicine, atoms and molecules are manipulated to produce nanostructures of the same size as biomolecules for interaction with human cells. This procedure offers a range of new solutions for diagnoses and "smart" treatments by stimulating the body's own repair mechanisms. It will enhance the early diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and cardiovascular diseases. Preventive medicine may then become a reality.

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Some drug delivery systems.
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f2-ijms-12-03303: Some drug delivery systems.

Mentions: Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have also become potential targets for drug delivery and cancer therapy. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are small peptide growth factors that play an important role in tumor growth and angiogenesis because of their high affinity to heparin. FGFRs are upregulated versus normal tissues in numerous tumor cells and tumor neovasculature in situ [60]. One candidate as a targeting ligand for tumor cells is the peptide KRTGQYKLC (bFGFp), which could interact with FGFR1 by binding to bFGF. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed on many human cancer cells surface, making it a target for anticancer drug delivery. Liposomes targeting this receptor promoted the effective intracellular delivery of doxorubicin to tumor cells, yielding superior anti-tumor effects in different in vivo assays. In previous studies, the peptide GE11 was identified as a novel ligand with high affinity towards EGFR and proved effective to mediate targeted liposome delivery to EGFR-positive tumors in vivo [61]. Investigations are ongoing into drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles with different geometry, compositions and surface modifications (Figure 2). They are providing researchers with an enormous collection of nanoparticles with promising applications [62].


Nanomedicine: application areas and development prospects.

Boulaiz H, Alvarez PJ, Ramirez A, Marchal JA, Prados J, Rodríguez-Serrano F, Perán M, Melguizo C, Aranega A - Int J Mol Sci (2011)

Some drug delivery systems.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116192&req=5

f2-ijms-12-03303: Some drug delivery systems.
Mentions: Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have also become potential targets for drug delivery and cancer therapy. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are small peptide growth factors that play an important role in tumor growth and angiogenesis because of their high affinity to heparin. FGFRs are upregulated versus normal tissues in numerous tumor cells and tumor neovasculature in situ [60]. One candidate as a targeting ligand for tumor cells is the peptide KRTGQYKLC (bFGFp), which could interact with FGFR1 by binding to bFGF. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed on many human cancer cells surface, making it a target for anticancer drug delivery. Liposomes targeting this receptor promoted the effective intracellular delivery of doxorubicin to tumor cells, yielding superior anti-tumor effects in different in vivo assays. In previous studies, the peptide GE11 was identified as a novel ligand with high affinity towards EGFR and proved effective to mediate targeted liposome delivery to EGFR-positive tumors in vivo [61]. Investigations are ongoing into drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles with different geometry, compositions and surface modifications (Figure 2). They are providing researchers with an enormous collection of nanoparticles with promising applications [62].

Bottom Line: In nanomedicine, atoms and molecules are manipulated to produce nanostructures of the same size as biomolecules for interaction with human cells.This procedure offers a range of new solutions for diagnoses and "smart" treatments by stimulating the body's own repair mechanisms.Preventive medicine may then become a reality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER), School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada 18071, Spain; E-Mails: pablo.alvarez.exts@juntadeandalucia.es (P.J.A.); alrari80@gmail.com (A.R.); jmarchal@ugr.es (J.A.M.); jcpradois@ugr.es (J.P.); fernrs@ugr.es (F.R.-S.); melguizo@ugr.es (C.M.).

ABSTRACT
Nanotechnology, along with related concepts such as nanomaterials, nanostructures and nanoparticles, has become a priority area for scientific research and technological development. Nanotechnology, i.e., the creation and utilization of materials and devices at nanometer scale, already has multiple applications in electronics and other fields. However, the greatest expectations are for its application in biotechnology and health, with the direct impact these could have on the quality of health in future societies. The emerging discipline of nanomedicine brings nanotechnology and medicine together in order to develop novel therapies and improve existing treatments. In nanomedicine, atoms and molecules are manipulated to produce nanostructures of the same size as biomolecules for interaction with human cells. This procedure offers a range of new solutions for diagnoses and "smart" treatments by stimulating the body's own repair mechanisms. It will enhance the early diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and cardiovascular diseases. Preventive medicine may then become a reality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus