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Phenols in leaves and bark of Fagus sylvatica as determinants of insect occurrences.

Petrakis PV, Spanos K, Feest A, Daskalakou E - Int J Mol Sci (2011)

Bottom Line: We found 298 insect species associated with beech trees and dead beech wood.While F. sylvatica and Quercus (oak) are confamilial, there are great differences in richness of the associated entomofauna.Bark and leaf biophenols from beech indicate that differences in plant secondary metabolites may be responsible for the differences in the richness of entomofauna in communities dominated by beech and other deciduous trees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Entomology, National Agricultural Research Foundation, Institute for Mediterranean Forest Ecosystem Research, Terma Alkmanos, Athens 11528, Greece; E-Mail: edaskalakou@fria.gr.

ABSTRACT
Beech forests play an important role in temperate and north Mediterranean ecosystems in Greece since they occupy infertile montane soils. In the last glacial maximum, Fagus sylvatica (beech) was confined to Southern Europe where it was dominant and in the last thousand years has expanded its range to dominate central Europe. We sampled four different beech forest types. We found 298 insect species associated with beech trees and dead beech wood. While F. sylvatica and Quercus (oak) are confamilial, there are great differences in richness of the associated entomofauna. Insect species that inhabit beech forests are less than one fifth of those species living in oak dominated forests despite the fact that beech is the most abundant central and north European tree. There is a distinct paucity of monophagous species on beech trees and most insect species are shared between co-occurring deciduous tree species and beech. This lack of species is attributed to the vegetation history and secondary plant chemistry. Bark and leaf biophenols from beech indicate that differences in plant secondary metabolites may be responsible for the differences in the richness of entomofauna in communities dominated by beech and other deciduous trees.

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Diagram of canonical discriminant analysis of the beech trees grouped according to the site and described in individual phenolic concentrations. Two discriminant axes account for a significant percentage (97.3%) of variation in the original data [17].
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f4-ijms-12-02769: Diagram of canonical discriminant analysis of the beech trees grouped according to the site and described in individual phenolic concentrations. Two discriminant axes account for a significant percentage (97.3%) of variation in the original data [17].

Mentions: In the plane of the discriminant analysis (λWilks = 0.004; Fapproximation = 19.65; df1 = 12; df2 = 34; p < 10−4) (Figure 4), which accounts for 100% of the variation in phenolic concentration, the percentage variation accounted for by each axis (87.5%, 9.7%, 2.7%) makes the first axis (CDA-1) dominant. The first discriminant axis separates the same groups of Figure 2 and 3 while the second axis separates individual sites. It can be seen also that sites at Aghioneri are located along the main diagonal of the CDA principal plane. This diagonal reflects a combined gradient of plant species richness.


Phenols in leaves and bark of Fagus sylvatica as determinants of insect occurrences.

Petrakis PV, Spanos K, Feest A, Daskalakou E - Int J Mol Sci (2011)

Diagram of canonical discriminant analysis of the beech trees grouped according to the site and described in individual phenolic concentrations. Two discriminant axes account for a significant percentage (97.3%) of variation in the original data [17].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116155&req=5

f4-ijms-12-02769: Diagram of canonical discriminant analysis of the beech trees grouped according to the site and described in individual phenolic concentrations. Two discriminant axes account for a significant percentage (97.3%) of variation in the original data [17].
Mentions: In the plane of the discriminant analysis (λWilks = 0.004; Fapproximation = 19.65; df1 = 12; df2 = 34; p < 10−4) (Figure 4), which accounts for 100% of the variation in phenolic concentration, the percentage variation accounted for by each axis (87.5%, 9.7%, 2.7%) makes the first axis (CDA-1) dominant. The first discriminant axis separates the same groups of Figure 2 and 3 while the second axis separates individual sites. It can be seen also that sites at Aghioneri are located along the main diagonal of the CDA principal plane. This diagonal reflects a combined gradient of plant species richness.

Bottom Line: We found 298 insect species associated with beech trees and dead beech wood.While F. sylvatica and Quercus (oak) are confamilial, there are great differences in richness of the associated entomofauna.Bark and leaf biophenols from beech indicate that differences in plant secondary metabolites may be responsible for the differences in the richness of entomofauna in communities dominated by beech and other deciduous trees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Entomology, National Agricultural Research Foundation, Institute for Mediterranean Forest Ecosystem Research, Terma Alkmanos, Athens 11528, Greece; E-Mail: edaskalakou@fria.gr.

ABSTRACT
Beech forests play an important role in temperate and north Mediterranean ecosystems in Greece since they occupy infertile montane soils. In the last glacial maximum, Fagus sylvatica (beech) was confined to Southern Europe where it was dominant and in the last thousand years has expanded its range to dominate central Europe. We sampled four different beech forest types. We found 298 insect species associated with beech trees and dead beech wood. While F. sylvatica and Quercus (oak) are confamilial, there are great differences in richness of the associated entomofauna. Insect species that inhabit beech forests are less than one fifth of those species living in oak dominated forests despite the fact that beech is the most abundant central and north European tree. There is a distinct paucity of monophagous species on beech trees and most insect species are shared between co-occurring deciduous tree species and beech. This lack of species is attributed to the vegetation history and secondary plant chemistry. Bark and leaf biophenols from beech indicate that differences in plant secondary metabolites may be responsible for the differences in the richness of entomofauna in communities dominated by beech and other deciduous trees.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus