Limits...
Hepatitis B Virus Genotype G forms core-like particles with unique structural properties.

Cotelesage JJ, Osiowy C, Lawrence C, DeVarennes SL, Teow S, Beniac DR, Booth TF - J. Viral Hepat. (2011)

Bottom Line: This results in a twelve amino acid insertion at the N-terminal end of the core protein, and two stop codons in the precore region that prevent the expression of HBeAg.We show that the position of the insertion would not interfere with translocation of nucleic acids through the pores to the core interior compartment.However, the insertion may partially obscure several residues on the core surface that are known to play a role in envelopment and secretion of virions, or that could affect structural rearrangements that may trigger envelopment after DNA second-strand synthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Viral Diseases Division, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Cryo-electron microscopy of HBV/G core-like particles. T = 3 particles (white arrows) and T = 4 particles (black arrows) are shown. Panels (b) and (c) illustrate the sorting of the T = 3 capsids from T = 4 capsids, respectively. The rotational average (top left in panels b and c) was used as a reference for sorting. Several representative sorted particles are presented. Characteristic class averages generated by projection matching for the T = 4 reconstruction are shown in (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116152&req=5

fig01: (a) Cryo-electron microscopy of HBV/G core-like particles. T = 3 particles (white arrows) and T = 4 particles (black arrows) are shown. Panels (b) and (c) illustrate the sorting of the T = 3 capsids from T = 4 capsids, respectively. The rotational average (top left in panels b and c) was used as a reference for sorting. Several representative sorted particles are presented. Characteristic class averages generated by projection matching for the T = 4 reconstruction are shown in (d).

Mentions: Cryo-EM and specimen preparation was performed as previously described [11,12]. Briefly, specimens on glow-discharged Quantifoil grids (Quantifoil MicroTools GmbH, Jena, Germany) were plunge cooled in liquid ethane using a Vitribot Mark IV (FEI Company). Specimens were imaged at 200 kV in a FEI Tecnai 20G2 electron microscope equipped with a 4K CCD camera (FEI Company, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA). Images were recorded at a magnification of 80 000×, (corresponding to 108 240× at the CCD detector, or 1.353 Å/pixel) using a total dose of 10 electrons/Å2 and a defocus of 3.5–6 μ. A total of 13 455 particles were analysed. Correction was made for the contrast transfer function using EMAN [13]. T = 3 or T = 4 capsids were separated in SPIDER [14] (Fig. 1b,c). Two populations of 1887, and 11 568 images of T = 3 and T = 4 capsids, respectively, were analysed.


Hepatitis B Virus Genotype G forms core-like particles with unique structural properties.

Cotelesage JJ, Osiowy C, Lawrence C, DeVarennes SL, Teow S, Beniac DR, Booth TF - J. Viral Hepat. (2011)

(a) Cryo-electron microscopy of HBV/G core-like particles. T = 3 particles (white arrows) and T = 4 particles (black arrows) are shown. Panels (b) and (c) illustrate the sorting of the T = 3 capsids from T = 4 capsids, respectively. The rotational average (top left in panels b and c) was used as a reference for sorting. Several representative sorted particles are presented. Characteristic class averages generated by projection matching for the T = 4 reconstruction are shown in (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116152&req=5

fig01: (a) Cryo-electron microscopy of HBV/G core-like particles. T = 3 particles (white arrows) and T = 4 particles (black arrows) are shown. Panels (b) and (c) illustrate the sorting of the T = 3 capsids from T = 4 capsids, respectively. The rotational average (top left in panels b and c) was used as a reference for sorting. Several representative sorted particles are presented. Characteristic class averages generated by projection matching for the T = 4 reconstruction are shown in (d).
Mentions: Cryo-EM and specimen preparation was performed as previously described [11,12]. Briefly, specimens on glow-discharged Quantifoil grids (Quantifoil MicroTools GmbH, Jena, Germany) were plunge cooled in liquid ethane using a Vitribot Mark IV (FEI Company). Specimens were imaged at 200 kV in a FEI Tecnai 20G2 electron microscope equipped with a 4K CCD camera (FEI Company, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA). Images were recorded at a magnification of 80 000×, (corresponding to 108 240× at the CCD detector, or 1.353 Å/pixel) using a total dose of 10 electrons/Å2 and a defocus of 3.5–6 μ. A total of 13 455 particles were analysed. Correction was made for the contrast transfer function using EMAN [13]. T = 3 or T = 4 capsids were separated in SPIDER [14] (Fig. 1b,c). Two populations of 1887, and 11 568 images of T = 3 and T = 4 capsids, respectively, were analysed.

Bottom Line: This results in a twelve amino acid insertion at the N-terminal end of the core protein, and two stop codons in the precore region that prevent the expression of HBeAg.We show that the position of the insertion would not interfere with translocation of nucleic acids through the pores to the core interior compartment.However, the insertion may partially obscure several residues on the core surface that are known to play a role in envelopment and secretion of virions, or that could affect structural rearrangements that may trigger envelopment after DNA second-strand synthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Viral Diseases Division, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus