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Microbial communities and chemosynthesis in yellowstone lake sublacustrine hydrothermal vent waters.

Yang T, Lyons S, Aguilar C, Cuhel R, Teske A - Front Microbiol (2011)

Bottom Line: They harbor distinct chemosynthetic bacterial communities, depending on temperature (16-110°C) and electron donor supply (H(2)S <1 to >100 μM; NH(3) <0.5 to >10 μM).Vents at lower temperatures yielded mostly phylotypes related to the mesophilic gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizer Thiovirga.In contrast, cool vent water with low chemosynthetic activity yielded predominantly phylotypes related to freshwater Actinobacterial clusters with a cosmopolitan distribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Five sublacustrine thermal spring locations from 1 to 109 m water depth in Yellowstone Lake were surveyed by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing in relation to their chemical composition and dark CO(2) fixation rates. They harbor distinct chemosynthetic bacterial communities, depending on temperature (16-110°C) and electron donor supply (H(2)S <1 to >100 μM; NH(3) <0.5 to >10 μM). Members of the Aquificales, most closely affiliated with the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, are the most frequently recovered bacterial 16S rRNA gene phylotypes in the hottest samples; the detection of these thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing autotrophs coincided with maximal dark CO(2) fixation rates reaching near 9 μM C h(-1) at temperatures of 50-60°C. Vents at lower temperatures yielded mostly phylotypes related to the mesophilic gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizer Thiovirga. In contrast, cool vent water with low chemosynthetic activity yielded predominantly phylotypes related to freshwater Actinobacterial clusters with a cosmopolitan distribution.

No MeSH data available.


Phylogeny of West Thumb Canyon 129 bacterial clones, based on E. coli gene nucleotide positions 25–573.
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Figure 6: Phylogeny of West Thumb Canyon 129 bacterial clones, based on E. coli gene nucleotide positions 25–573.

Mentions: The microbial communities of the Stevenson Island 72 and West Thumb Canyon 129 resembled each other, as confirmed by clustering in PCA analysis (Figure 3). West Thumb Canyon 129 had the next-highest temperature (77°C) after the Stevenson Island sample; both samples shared abundant Aquificales clones specifically related to the cultured species of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, and to Sulfurihydrogenibium-related clones from different locations within Yellowstone National Park (Figure 6). The abundance of Sulfurihydrogenibium clones is consistent with the high sulfur-stimulated chemosynthetic rates at 60°C, and the lower but still substantial rates at 50°C in these two samples (Figure 1). Since chemosynthesis rates and sulfur stimulation persisted at 80°C at West Thumb Canyon 129 (Figure 1), it is possible that this sample contained high-temperature-adapted strains of Sulfurihydrogenibium, or different types of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles that remain to be found. Next to the Aquificales, the most frequently recovered clones represent Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which occur in the West Thumb Canyon 129, Stevenson Island 72, Mary Bay West 12, and (to a lesser extent, only Betaproteobacteria) the Mary Bay Canyon 28 samples (Table 1).


Microbial communities and chemosynthesis in yellowstone lake sublacustrine hydrothermal vent waters.

Yang T, Lyons S, Aguilar C, Cuhel R, Teske A - Front Microbiol (2011)

Phylogeny of West Thumb Canyon 129 bacterial clones, based on E. coli gene nucleotide positions 25–573.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3116135&req=5

Figure 6: Phylogeny of West Thumb Canyon 129 bacterial clones, based on E. coli gene nucleotide positions 25–573.
Mentions: The microbial communities of the Stevenson Island 72 and West Thumb Canyon 129 resembled each other, as confirmed by clustering in PCA analysis (Figure 3). West Thumb Canyon 129 had the next-highest temperature (77°C) after the Stevenson Island sample; both samples shared abundant Aquificales clones specifically related to the cultured species of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, and to Sulfurihydrogenibium-related clones from different locations within Yellowstone National Park (Figure 6). The abundance of Sulfurihydrogenibium clones is consistent with the high sulfur-stimulated chemosynthetic rates at 60°C, and the lower but still substantial rates at 50°C in these two samples (Figure 1). Since chemosynthesis rates and sulfur stimulation persisted at 80°C at West Thumb Canyon 129 (Figure 1), it is possible that this sample contained high-temperature-adapted strains of Sulfurihydrogenibium, or different types of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles that remain to be found. Next to the Aquificales, the most frequently recovered clones represent Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which occur in the West Thumb Canyon 129, Stevenson Island 72, Mary Bay West 12, and (to a lesser extent, only Betaproteobacteria) the Mary Bay Canyon 28 samples (Table 1).

Bottom Line: They harbor distinct chemosynthetic bacterial communities, depending on temperature (16-110°C) and electron donor supply (H(2)S <1 to >100 μM; NH(3) <0.5 to >10 μM).Vents at lower temperatures yielded mostly phylotypes related to the mesophilic gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizer Thiovirga.In contrast, cool vent water with low chemosynthetic activity yielded predominantly phylotypes related to freshwater Actinobacterial clusters with a cosmopolitan distribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Five sublacustrine thermal spring locations from 1 to 109 m water depth in Yellowstone Lake were surveyed by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing in relation to their chemical composition and dark CO(2) fixation rates. They harbor distinct chemosynthetic bacterial communities, depending on temperature (16-110°C) and electron donor supply (H(2)S <1 to >100 μM; NH(3) <0.5 to >10 μM). Members of the Aquificales, most closely affiliated with the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, are the most frequently recovered bacterial 16S rRNA gene phylotypes in the hottest samples; the detection of these thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing autotrophs coincided with maximal dark CO(2) fixation rates reaching near 9 μM C h(-1) at temperatures of 50-60°C. Vents at lower temperatures yielded mostly phylotypes related to the mesophilic gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizer Thiovirga. In contrast, cool vent water with low chemosynthetic activity yielded predominantly phylotypes related to freshwater Actinobacterial clusters with a cosmopolitan distribution.

No MeSH data available.