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Proliferation/quiescence: the controversial "aller-retour".

Daignan-Fornier B, Sagot I - Cell Div (2011)

Bottom Line: Establishing the quiescent state while maintaining the capacity to re-enter the proliferation cycle are critical for cell survival and must be tightly orchestrated to avoid pathological proliferation.Hence, studying the biology of quiescent cells is an exciting research field.Taking advantage of technical progress in genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic, the nature of transitions between proliferation and quiescence have been recently re-visited in budding yeast.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Biochimie et Génétique Cellulaires, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux Cedex, France. isabelle.sagot@ibgc.cnrs.fr.

ABSTRACT
The vast majority of cells, from prokaryotes up to vertebrate organisms, spend most of their time in quiescence, a state defined as a temporary and reversible absence of proliferation. Establishing the quiescent state while maintaining the capacity to re-enter the proliferation cycle are critical for cell survival and must be tightly orchestrated to avoid pathological proliferation. Hence, studying the biology of quiescent cells is an exciting research field. Taking advantage of technical progress in genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic, the nature of transitions between proliferation and quiescence have been recently re-visited in budding yeast. Together with new findings in cell biology, these studies resuscitate an old demon in the field: the controversial existence of a "quiescence program".

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Quiescence may be a unique cellular state that results from a dedicated program committing cells to quiescence. (B) Quiescence may vary depending on cell's history or (C) depending on the time spent in quiescence.
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Figure 1: (A) Quiescence may be a unique cellular state that results from a dedicated program committing cells to quiescence. (B) Quiescence may vary depending on cell's history or (C) depending on the time spent in quiescence.

Mentions: Quiescence is the most common cellular state on earth. While it is relatively easy to describe a proliferating cell, defining a quiescent cell is rather difficult. A commonly accepted, yet highly operational, definition of quiescence is "a reversible absence of proliferation". Consequently, a cell that is not dividing but eventually will when conditions become appropriate, is considered as a bona fide quiescent cell. But this definition is rather vague and probably encompasses various cellular situations. Therefore, instead of a single quiescent state, one can imagine that there may be distinct quiescent states depending on the cell's history before entry into quiescence, and/or depending on the time spent in quiescence (early quiescence, deep quiescence..., see Figure 1). This raises the delicate question of the existence of a quiescence "program". In other words, does quiescence result from a dedicated gene expression pattern that commits cells to the quiescent state or is quiescence an ultimate form of slow growth which would be a passive consequence of a cell's adaptation to unfavorable external conditions?


Proliferation/quiescence: the controversial "aller-retour".

Daignan-Fornier B, Sagot I - Cell Div (2011)

(A) Quiescence may be a unique cellular state that results from a dedicated program committing cells to quiescence. (B) Quiescence may vary depending on cell's history or (C) depending on the time spent in quiescence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113920&req=5

Figure 1: (A) Quiescence may be a unique cellular state that results from a dedicated program committing cells to quiescence. (B) Quiescence may vary depending on cell's history or (C) depending on the time spent in quiescence.
Mentions: Quiescence is the most common cellular state on earth. While it is relatively easy to describe a proliferating cell, defining a quiescent cell is rather difficult. A commonly accepted, yet highly operational, definition of quiescence is "a reversible absence of proliferation". Consequently, a cell that is not dividing but eventually will when conditions become appropriate, is considered as a bona fide quiescent cell. But this definition is rather vague and probably encompasses various cellular situations. Therefore, instead of a single quiescent state, one can imagine that there may be distinct quiescent states depending on the cell's history before entry into quiescence, and/or depending on the time spent in quiescence (early quiescence, deep quiescence..., see Figure 1). This raises the delicate question of the existence of a quiescence "program". In other words, does quiescence result from a dedicated gene expression pattern that commits cells to the quiescent state or is quiescence an ultimate form of slow growth which would be a passive consequence of a cell's adaptation to unfavorable external conditions?

Bottom Line: Establishing the quiescent state while maintaining the capacity to re-enter the proliferation cycle are critical for cell survival and must be tightly orchestrated to avoid pathological proliferation.Hence, studying the biology of quiescent cells is an exciting research field.Taking advantage of technical progress in genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic, the nature of transitions between proliferation and quiescence have been recently re-visited in budding yeast.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Biochimie et Génétique Cellulaires, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux Cedex, France. isabelle.sagot@ibgc.cnrs.fr.

ABSTRACT
The vast majority of cells, from prokaryotes up to vertebrate organisms, spend most of their time in quiescence, a state defined as a temporary and reversible absence of proliferation. Establishing the quiescent state while maintaining the capacity to re-enter the proliferation cycle are critical for cell survival and must be tightly orchestrated to avoid pathological proliferation. Hence, studying the biology of quiescent cells is an exciting research field. Taking advantage of technical progress in genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic, the nature of transitions between proliferation and quiescence have been recently re-visited in budding yeast. Together with new findings in cell biology, these studies resuscitate an old demon in the field: the controversial existence of a "quiescence program".

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus