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Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support.

Doyle RS, Bellenger CR, Campoy L, McAllister H - Ir Vet J (2005)

Bottom Line: Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed.Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively.Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Right lateral thoracic radiograph 15 days post-surgery.
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Figure 3: Right lateral thoracic radiograph 15 days post-surgery.

Mentions: Thoracic radiographs were taken 15 days post-surgery and showed a complete resolution of the pleural effusion. The lungs were fully inflated and the thoracic structures were clearly visible (Figure 3, p213). No clinical or radiographic abnormalities were detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.


Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support.

Doyle RS, Bellenger CR, Campoy L, McAllister H - Ir Vet J (2005)

Right lateral thoracic radiograph 15 days post-surgery.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113913&req=5

Figure 3: Right lateral thoracic radiograph 15 days post-surgery.
Mentions: Thoracic radiographs were taken 15 days post-surgery and showed a complete resolution of the pleural effusion. The lungs were fully inflated and the thoracic structures were clearly visible (Figure 3, p213). No clinical or radiographic abnormalities were detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

Bottom Line: Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed.Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively.Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus