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Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support.

Doyle RS, Bellenger CR, Campoy L, McAllister H - Ir Vet J (2005)

Bottom Line: Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed.Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively.Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoperative photograph of exploratory sternotomy of thoracic cavity.
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Figure 2: Intraoperative photograph of exploratory sternotomy of thoracic cavity.

Mentions: An oesophagostomy tube was inserted on the left side of the neck. A ventral sternotomy was commenced caudal to the xiphisternum, extending cranially through two-thirds of the sternum. The muscles overlying the sternum were reflected using a combination of sharp incision, periosteal elevation and diathermy. The sternebrae were partly incised with a scalpel blade and the sternotomy was completed with scissors exposing both pleural spaces. Approximately 100 ml of yellow-grey purulent material was aspirated from the pleural cavity. Necrotic mediastinal tissue was resected, including what appeared to be a walled-off abscess in the caudal central part of the thorax (Figure 2, p212). Complete debridement was not possible without lung trauma; therefore, necrotic adhesions to the visceral pleura were not removed. Copious lavage of the thoracic cavity with sterile saline was performed. Thoracic drains (Thoracic trocar and drain; Vygon: 14 Ch) were inserted into both pleural cavities, entering the thorax at the right and left eight intercostal spaces and extending cranially on the thoracic floor. The sternotomy was closed with figure-of-eight sutures of 4 metric polypropylene (Prolene; Ethicon). The subcutaneous tissue and skin were closed routinely. A light dressing was placed around the thorax to secure the thoracic drains in place.


Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support.

Doyle RS, Bellenger CR, Campoy L, McAllister H - Ir Vet J (2005)

Intraoperative photograph of exploratory sternotomy of thoracic cavity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113913&req=5

Figure 2: Intraoperative photograph of exploratory sternotomy of thoracic cavity.
Mentions: An oesophagostomy tube was inserted on the left side of the neck. A ventral sternotomy was commenced caudal to the xiphisternum, extending cranially through two-thirds of the sternum. The muscles overlying the sternum were reflected using a combination of sharp incision, periosteal elevation and diathermy. The sternebrae were partly incised with a scalpel blade and the sternotomy was completed with scissors exposing both pleural spaces. Approximately 100 ml of yellow-grey purulent material was aspirated from the pleural cavity. Necrotic mediastinal tissue was resected, including what appeared to be a walled-off abscess in the caudal central part of the thorax (Figure 2, p212). Complete debridement was not possible without lung trauma; therefore, necrotic adhesions to the visceral pleura were not removed. Copious lavage of the thoracic cavity with sterile saline was performed. Thoracic drains (Thoracic trocar and drain; Vygon: 14 Ch) were inserted into both pleural cavities, entering the thorax at the right and left eight intercostal spaces and extending cranially on the thoracic floor. The sternotomy was closed with figure-of-eight sutures of 4 metric polypropylene (Prolene; Ethicon). The subcutaneous tissue and skin were closed routinely. A light dressing was placed around the thorax to secure the thoracic drains in place.

Bottom Line: Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed.Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively.Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus