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Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support.

Doyle RS, Bellenger CR, Campoy L, McAllister H - Ir Vet J (2005)

Bottom Line: Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed.Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively.Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Right lateral thoracic radiograph pre-surgery.
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Figure 1: Right lateral thoracic radiograph pre-surgery.

Mentions: An intravenous catheter was placed in the left cephalic vein and lactated Ringer's solution (Compound Sodium Lactate; Ivex Pharmaceuticals) was administered at a rate of 40 ml/kg/h. Thoracic radiographs (Figure 1, p211) were taken without sedation and revealed a fluid/soft tissue opacity in the ventral thorax obscuring the cardiac silhouette and ventral diaphragmatic margin. The lungs were separated from the thoracic wall at the costodiaphragmatic recess and right hemithorax, indicating the presence of a pleural effusion. Ultrasonographic examination of the thoracic cavity confirmed the presence of a pleural effusion. This was highly echogenic with large amounts of flocculent material oscillating within it. The thoracic cavity had a loculated appearance, particularly in the ventral caudal region.


Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support.

Doyle RS, Bellenger CR, Campoy L, McAllister H - Ir Vet J (2005)

Right lateral thoracic radiograph pre-surgery.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113913&req=5

Figure 1: Right lateral thoracic radiograph pre-surgery.
Mentions: An intravenous catheter was placed in the left cephalic vein and lactated Ringer's solution (Compound Sodium Lactate; Ivex Pharmaceuticals) was administered at a rate of 40 ml/kg/h. Thoracic radiographs (Figure 1, p211) were taken without sedation and revealed a fluid/soft tissue opacity in the ventral thorax obscuring the cardiac silhouette and ventral diaphragmatic margin. The lungs were separated from the thoracic wall at the costodiaphragmatic recess and right hemithorax, indicating the presence of a pleural effusion. Ultrasonographic examination of the thoracic cavity confirmed the presence of a pleural effusion. This was highly echogenic with large amounts of flocculent material oscillating within it. The thoracic cavity had a loculated appearance, particularly in the ventral caudal region.

Bottom Line: Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed.Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively.Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus