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Non-accidental injury in companion animals in the Republic of Ireland.

McGuinness K, Allen M, Jones BR - Ir Vet J (2005)

Bottom Line: The questionnaire was sent to 600 veterinarians; completed submissions were received from 115 respondents (19.2%).The occurrence of NAI was acknowledged by 106 (92.2%) of the respondents and cases had been seen by 50 (43.3%) of them, comprised of 36.2% of urban veterinary surgeons from rural towns and of 82% of urban practitioners.In 59% of cases the client indicated the injury was non-accidental; 39 (67.2%) of the 58 reported cases involved a single event.The types of injuries observed included burns, lacerations, gunshot wounds, poisoning, injury to genitalia, bruising and fractures.The findings of this study are comparable with those from other countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin 4. boyd.jones@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Non-accidental injury (NAI), animal abuse and "battered pet" syndrome are terms used to identify "the intentional harm of an animal". The terms include, but are not limited to, wilful neglect, inflicting injury, pain or distress, or malicious killing of an animal. Three categories of abuse are recognised: physical, sexual and neglect.A postal survey was conducted to determine the extent to which NAI was recognised by veterinary surgeons in urban, semi-rural and rural veterinary practices in the Republic of Ireland. The questionnaire was sent to 600 veterinarians; completed submissions were received from 115 respondents (19.2%).The occurrence of NAI was acknowledged by 106 (92.2%) of the respondents and cases had been seen by 50 (43.3%) of them, comprised of 36.2% of urban veterinary surgeons from rural towns and of 82% of urban practitioners. In 59% of cases the client indicated the injury was non-accidental; 39 (67.2%) of the 58 reported cases involved a single event. Signs that made veterinary surgeons suspicious of NAI included inconsistent history, untreated injuries, recurring injuries, meekness of the animal, suspicious behaviour of the owner and injuries consistent with abuse. The types of injuries observed included burns, lacerations, gunshot wounds, poisoning, injury to genitalia, bruising and fractures.The findings of this study are comparable with those from other countries. Most but not all veterinary surgeons in Ireland recognise NAI and animal abuse is of significant concern in rural and urban communities as evidenced by this survey of practising veterinary surgeons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fifty-eight cases of non-accidental injury: displayed by year of occurrence.
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Figure 1: Fifty-eight cases of non-accidental injury: displayed by year of occurrence.

Mentions: Fifty respondents recorded 58 cases of NAI (Figure 1). These cases involved 53 dogs, four cats, and one rabbit. Sixteen cases (30.1%) in dogs involved collies or collie cross dogs and eight cases (15.1%) involved crossbred dogs. All reported incidences in cats involved domestic short hair cats. Animals of all ages were represented in the case reports (Figure 2).


Non-accidental injury in companion animals in the Republic of Ireland.

McGuinness K, Allen M, Jones BR - Ir Vet J (2005)

Fifty-eight cases of non-accidental injury: displayed by year of occurrence.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113912&req=5

Figure 1: Fifty-eight cases of non-accidental injury: displayed by year of occurrence.
Mentions: Fifty respondents recorded 58 cases of NAI (Figure 1). These cases involved 53 dogs, four cats, and one rabbit. Sixteen cases (30.1%) in dogs involved collies or collie cross dogs and eight cases (15.1%) involved crossbred dogs. All reported incidences in cats involved domestic short hair cats. Animals of all ages were represented in the case reports (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The questionnaire was sent to 600 veterinarians; completed submissions were received from 115 respondents (19.2%).The occurrence of NAI was acknowledged by 106 (92.2%) of the respondents and cases had been seen by 50 (43.3%) of them, comprised of 36.2% of urban veterinary surgeons from rural towns and of 82% of urban practitioners.In 59% of cases the client indicated the injury was non-accidental; 39 (67.2%) of the 58 reported cases involved a single event.The types of injuries observed included burns, lacerations, gunshot wounds, poisoning, injury to genitalia, bruising and fractures.The findings of this study are comparable with those from other countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin 4. boyd.jones@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Non-accidental injury (NAI), animal abuse and "battered pet" syndrome are terms used to identify "the intentional harm of an animal". The terms include, but are not limited to, wilful neglect, inflicting injury, pain or distress, or malicious killing of an animal. Three categories of abuse are recognised: physical, sexual and neglect.A postal survey was conducted to determine the extent to which NAI was recognised by veterinary surgeons in urban, semi-rural and rural veterinary practices in the Republic of Ireland. The questionnaire was sent to 600 veterinarians; completed submissions were received from 115 respondents (19.2%).The occurrence of NAI was acknowledged by 106 (92.2%) of the respondents and cases had been seen by 50 (43.3%) of them, comprised of 36.2% of urban veterinary surgeons from rural towns and of 82% of urban practitioners. In 59% of cases the client indicated the injury was non-accidental; 39 (67.2%) of the 58 reported cases involved a single event. Signs that made veterinary surgeons suspicious of NAI included inconsistent history, untreated injuries, recurring injuries, meekness of the animal, suspicious behaviour of the owner and injuries consistent with abuse. The types of injuries observed included burns, lacerations, gunshot wounds, poisoning, injury to genitalia, bruising and fractures.The findings of this study are comparable with those from other countries. Most but not all veterinary surgeons in Ireland recognise NAI and animal abuse is of significant concern in rural and urban communities as evidenced by this survey of practising veterinary surgeons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus