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The antiquity and evolutionary history of social behavior in bees.

Cardinal S, Danforth BN - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: We conclude that eusociality evolved once in the common ancestor of the corbiculate Apidae, advanced eusociality evolved independently in the honey and stingless bees, and that eusociality was lost in the orchid bees.Fossil-calibrated divergence time estimates reveal that eusociality first evolved at least 87 Mya (78 to 95 Mya) in the corbiculates, much earlier than in other groups of bees with less complex social behavior.These results provide a robust new evolutionary framework for studies of the organization and genetic basis of social behavior in honey bees and their relatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America. scc44@cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
A long-standing controversy in bee social evolution concerns whether highly eusocial behavior has evolved once or twice within the corbiculate Apidae. Corbiculate bees include the highly eusocial honey bees and stingless bees, the primitively eusocial bumble bees, and the predominantly solitary or communal orchid bees. Here we use a model-based approach to reconstruct the evolutionary history of eusociality and date the antiquity of eusocial behavior in apid bees, using a recent molecular phylogeny of the Apidae. We conclude that eusociality evolved once in the common ancestor of the corbiculate Apidae, advanced eusociality evolved independently in the honey and stingless bees, and that eusociality was lost in the orchid bees. Fossil-calibrated divergence time estimates reveal that eusociality first evolved at least 87 Mya (78 to 95 Mya) in the corbiculates, much earlier than in other groups of bees with less complex social behavior. These results provide a robust new evolutionary framework for studies of the organization and genetic basis of social behavior in honey bees and their relatives.

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The antiquity of eusocial clades.The behavioral character is mapped onto the chronogram of Apidae [13] according to the results of the Bayesian ancestral state reconstruction of the traditional social level character. Outgroup taxa used in the fossil-calibrated phylogeny have been removed from the chronogram. Black bars represent the 95% highest posterior density (HPD) on the estimated age of the eusocial clades.
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pone-0021086-g002: The antiquity of eusocial clades.The behavioral character is mapped onto the chronogram of Apidae [13] according to the results of the Bayesian ancestral state reconstruction of the traditional social level character. Outgroup taxa used in the fossil-calibrated phylogeny have been removed from the chronogram. Black bars represent the 95% highest posterior density (HPD) on the estimated age of the eusocial clades.

Mentions: Mapping our behavioral character state reconstructions onto the chronogram of Cardinal et al. [13] (Fig. 2), we estimate that primitive eusociality evolved once in the allodapines, whose extant lineages originated 53 Mya (41 to 65 Mya), and once in the corbiculate bees, whose extant lineages originated 87 Mya (78 to 95 Mya). The estimated age of origin for extant members of the highly eusocial stingless bees is 58 Mya (56 to 61 Mya) and for extant members of the highly eusocial honey bees is 22 Mya (16 to 30 Mya). The primitively eusocial bumble bees are estimated to have originated 21 Mya (12 to 31 Mya) and orchid bees 28 Mya (21 to 35 Mya).


The antiquity and evolutionary history of social behavior in bees.

Cardinal S, Danforth BN - PLoS ONE (2011)

The antiquity of eusocial clades.The behavioral character is mapped onto the chronogram of Apidae [13] according to the results of the Bayesian ancestral state reconstruction of the traditional social level character. Outgroup taxa used in the fossil-calibrated phylogeny have been removed from the chronogram. Black bars represent the 95% highest posterior density (HPD) on the estimated age of the eusocial clades.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113908&req=5

pone-0021086-g002: The antiquity of eusocial clades.The behavioral character is mapped onto the chronogram of Apidae [13] according to the results of the Bayesian ancestral state reconstruction of the traditional social level character. Outgroup taxa used in the fossil-calibrated phylogeny have been removed from the chronogram. Black bars represent the 95% highest posterior density (HPD) on the estimated age of the eusocial clades.
Mentions: Mapping our behavioral character state reconstructions onto the chronogram of Cardinal et al. [13] (Fig. 2), we estimate that primitive eusociality evolved once in the allodapines, whose extant lineages originated 53 Mya (41 to 65 Mya), and once in the corbiculate bees, whose extant lineages originated 87 Mya (78 to 95 Mya). The estimated age of origin for extant members of the highly eusocial stingless bees is 58 Mya (56 to 61 Mya) and for extant members of the highly eusocial honey bees is 22 Mya (16 to 30 Mya). The primitively eusocial bumble bees are estimated to have originated 21 Mya (12 to 31 Mya) and orchid bees 28 Mya (21 to 35 Mya).

Bottom Line: We conclude that eusociality evolved once in the common ancestor of the corbiculate Apidae, advanced eusociality evolved independently in the honey and stingless bees, and that eusociality was lost in the orchid bees.Fossil-calibrated divergence time estimates reveal that eusociality first evolved at least 87 Mya (78 to 95 Mya) in the corbiculates, much earlier than in other groups of bees with less complex social behavior.These results provide a robust new evolutionary framework for studies of the organization and genetic basis of social behavior in honey bees and their relatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America. scc44@cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
A long-standing controversy in bee social evolution concerns whether highly eusocial behavior has evolved once or twice within the corbiculate Apidae. Corbiculate bees include the highly eusocial honey bees and stingless bees, the primitively eusocial bumble bees, and the predominantly solitary or communal orchid bees. Here we use a model-based approach to reconstruct the evolutionary history of eusociality and date the antiquity of eusocial behavior in apid bees, using a recent molecular phylogeny of the Apidae. We conclude that eusociality evolved once in the common ancestor of the corbiculate Apidae, advanced eusociality evolved independently in the honey and stingless bees, and that eusociality was lost in the orchid bees. Fossil-calibrated divergence time estimates reveal that eusociality first evolved at least 87 Mya (78 to 95 Mya) in the corbiculates, much earlier than in other groups of bees with less complex social behavior. These results provide a robust new evolutionary framework for studies of the organization and genetic basis of social behavior in honey bees and their relatives.

Show MeSH