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Exotic diseases of dogs and cats at risk of importation to Ireland.

Goodfellow M, Shaw S - Ir Vet J (2005)

Bottom Line: : Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland.This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, North Somerset BS40 5DU, UK. susan.e.shaw@bristol.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
: Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland. This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Buccal mucosal petechiation in a clinical case of ehrlichosis in a dog (E. canis).
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Figure 4: Buccal mucosal petechiation in a clinical case of ehrlichosis in a dog (E. canis).

Mentions: Following infection, there is an acute phase of illness (eight to 20 days) followed by clinical remission, which may last for years. In susceptible animals, a waxing and waning syndrome of chronic ehrlichiosis develops associated with bone marrow dysplasia and other immune-mediated organ damage. Coinfection with Babesia spp. and L. infantum is common in endemic areas. In acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, clinical signs include fever, anorexia, and lymphadenopathy combined with a bleeding disorder. Petechiation (Figure 4), epistaxis, intraocular bleeding are common due to immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. Dogs, which are subclinically infected, may relapse intermittently with immunosuppressive episodes. In chronic disease, hypergammaglobulinaemia is a feature as are signs of bone marrow damage. This may be restricted to platelet precursors but varying degrees of non-regenerative anaemia, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia may develop in susceptible animals. In the German shepherd breed, pancytopenia may be irreversible and fatal.


Exotic diseases of dogs and cats at risk of importation to Ireland.

Goodfellow M, Shaw S - Ir Vet J (2005)

Buccal mucosal petechiation in a clinical case of ehrlichosis in a dog (E. canis).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113903&req=5

Figure 4: Buccal mucosal petechiation in a clinical case of ehrlichosis in a dog (E. canis).
Mentions: Following infection, there is an acute phase of illness (eight to 20 days) followed by clinical remission, which may last for years. In susceptible animals, a waxing and waning syndrome of chronic ehrlichiosis develops associated with bone marrow dysplasia and other immune-mediated organ damage. Coinfection with Babesia spp. and L. infantum is common in endemic areas. In acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, clinical signs include fever, anorexia, and lymphadenopathy combined with a bleeding disorder. Petechiation (Figure 4), epistaxis, intraocular bleeding are common due to immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. Dogs, which are subclinically infected, may relapse intermittently with immunosuppressive episodes. In chronic disease, hypergammaglobulinaemia is a feature as are signs of bone marrow damage. This may be restricted to platelet precursors but varying degrees of non-regenerative anaemia, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia may develop in susceptible animals. In the German shepherd breed, pancytopenia may be irreversible and fatal.

Bottom Line: : Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland.This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, North Somerset BS40 5DU, UK. susan.e.shaw@bristol.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
: Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland. This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus