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Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis in dogs: A review.

O'Neill EJ, Merrett D, Jones B - Ir Vet J (2005)

Bottom Line: The aetiology of the disease remains unknown, although an immune-mediated cause is suspected.This article reviewed the typical history, clinical signs and pathology of the condition along with current opinions on pathogenesis.The potential differential diagnoses for the disease were discussed along with current treatment options.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Ireland. emma.oneill@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in dogs that is characterised by focal or disseminated granulomatous lesions within the brain and/or spinal cord, non-suppurative meningitis and perivascular mononuclear cuffing. The aetiology of the disease remains unknown, although an immune-mediated cause is suspected. This article reviewed the typical history, clinical signs and pathology of the condition along with current opinions on pathogenesis. The potential differential diagnoses for the disease were discussed along with current treatment options.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sections from brains of GME cases: A) Section showing a characteristic perivascular cuff lesion around a blood vessel comprising a predominantly mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate. Haemotoxylin and Eosin. Original magnification ×40 (top left). B) Section demonstrating characteristic 'whorling' pattern of inflammatory cells within the CNS white matter. Reticulin-staining. Original magnification ×20 (bottom left).
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Figure 1: Sections from brains of GME cases: A) Section showing a characteristic perivascular cuff lesion around a blood vessel comprising a predominantly mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate. Haemotoxylin and Eosin. Original magnification ×40 (top left). B) Section demonstrating characteristic 'whorling' pattern of inflammatory cells within the CNS white matter. Reticulin-staining. Original magnification ×20 (bottom left).

Mentions: Histologically, GME lesions occur predominantly within the white matter of the CNS, characterised by dense aggregates of inflammatory cells arranged in whorling patterns around blood vessels. These perivascular cuffs (Figure 1) comprise principally macrophages along with varying numbers of lymphocytes, monocytes, plasma cells, and lesser numbers of neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells [4,10,6,23]. L ymphocytes and macrophages represent the dominant cell types in the lesions; however, marked variation is described: some granulomas being principally lymphoid, some not perivascular, and some with eccentric development of a granuloma from an existing perivascular cuff [2,6,23]. Typically, lesions are widely distributed within the CNS but they occur most commonly within the white matter of the cerebrum, cerebellum, caudal brainstem or cervical spinal cord. Comparable lesions may also be observed in grey matter and there may be lesions involving the vasculature of leptomeninges or choroid plexus [6,31].


Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis in dogs: A review.

O'Neill EJ, Merrett D, Jones B - Ir Vet J (2005)

Sections from brains of GME cases: A) Section showing a characteristic perivascular cuff lesion around a blood vessel comprising a predominantly mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate. Haemotoxylin and Eosin. Original magnification ×40 (top left). B) Section demonstrating characteristic 'whorling' pattern of inflammatory cells within the CNS white matter. Reticulin-staining. Original magnification ×20 (bottom left).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113901&req=5

Figure 1: Sections from brains of GME cases: A) Section showing a characteristic perivascular cuff lesion around a blood vessel comprising a predominantly mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate. Haemotoxylin and Eosin. Original magnification ×40 (top left). B) Section demonstrating characteristic 'whorling' pattern of inflammatory cells within the CNS white matter. Reticulin-staining. Original magnification ×20 (bottom left).
Mentions: Histologically, GME lesions occur predominantly within the white matter of the CNS, characterised by dense aggregates of inflammatory cells arranged in whorling patterns around blood vessels. These perivascular cuffs (Figure 1) comprise principally macrophages along with varying numbers of lymphocytes, monocytes, plasma cells, and lesser numbers of neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells [4,10,6,23]. L ymphocytes and macrophages represent the dominant cell types in the lesions; however, marked variation is described: some granulomas being principally lymphoid, some not perivascular, and some with eccentric development of a granuloma from an existing perivascular cuff [2,6,23]. Typically, lesions are widely distributed within the CNS but they occur most commonly within the white matter of the cerebrum, cerebellum, caudal brainstem or cervical spinal cord. Comparable lesions may also be observed in grey matter and there may be lesions involving the vasculature of leptomeninges or choroid plexus [6,31].

Bottom Line: The aetiology of the disease remains unknown, although an immune-mediated cause is suspected.This article reviewed the typical history, clinical signs and pathology of the condition along with current opinions on pathogenesis.The potential differential diagnoses for the disease were discussed along with current treatment options.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Ireland. emma.oneill@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in dogs that is characterised by focal or disseminated granulomatous lesions within the brain and/or spinal cord, non-suppurative meningitis and perivascular mononuclear cuffing. The aetiology of the disease remains unknown, although an immune-mediated cause is suspected. This article reviewed the typical history, clinical signs and pathology of the condition along with current opinions on pathogenesis. The potential differential diagnoses for the disease were discussed along with current treatment options.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus