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Imbedding HACCP principles in dairy herd health and production management: case report on calf rearing.

Boersema J, Noordhuizen J, Vieira A, Lievaart J, Baumgartner W - Ir Vet J (2008)

Bottom Line: Until now, an exception has been made for primary producers, but as regulations evolve, on-farm HACCP-like programmes should be ready to assure food safety as well as animal health and animal welfare.The veterinarian is pivotal for the facility-based HACCP team, since he/she has knowledge about on-farm risk assessment and relations between clinical pathology, feed and farm management.The HACCP concept in combination with veterinary herd health and production management programmes offers a promising approach to optimise on-farm production processes (i.e., young stock rearing) in addition to a structural approach for quality risk management on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Utrecht, Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Utrecht, Netherlands. j.s.c.boersema@uu.nl.

ABSTRACT
Driven by consumer demands, European legislation has suggested the use of HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) as the quality risk management programme for the whole dairy chain. Until now, an exception has been made for primary producers, but as regulations evolve, on-farm HACCP-like programmes should be ready to assure food safety as well as animal health and animal welfare. In our field experiment, the HACCP-concept was used to combine both optimal farm management and formalisation of quality assurance in an on-farm situation in the Netherlands. The process of young stock rearing was chosen, since its importance for the future of the farm is often underestimated. Hazards and their associated risk factors can be controlled within the farm-specific standards and tolerances, as targets can be controlled by corrective measures and by implementation of farm-specific worksheets. The veterinarian is pivotal for the facility-based HACCP team, since he/she has knowledge about on-farm risk assessment and relations between clinical pathology, feed and farm management. The HACCP concept in combination with veterinary herd health and production management programmes offers a promising approach to optimise on-farm production processes (i.e., young stock rearing) in addition to a structural approach for quality risk management on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth performance of young stock on farm M.
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Figure 2: Growth performance of young stock on farm M.

Mentions: In Figure 2 the results of the young stock measurement for farm M are given. The dots represent individual animals. Microsoft Excel was used to define a trend line for individual measurements; represented by the black line in Figure 2. The two dashed lines in the figure describe the on-farm tolerances (+ and - 5% trend line = target weight tolerances for young stock growth). From the figure, the deviating animals can be spotted outside the tolerance borders. Four remarkable dots can be seen outside the -5% tolerance border. The farmer was surprised by these findings, but when the deviating animals were identified, it became clear that each of these animals had a specific clinical history and were just marked as small animals. Approximately 10 animals were found to be 'too heavy' (above the +5% tolerance), which confirms the presumption that some of the young stock (older than one year) had a tendency to fatten. These findings are supported by the results from the body condition scoring.


Imbedding HACCP principles in dairy herd health and production management: case report on calf rearing.

Boersema J, Noordhuizen J, Vieira A, Lievaart J, Baumgartner W - Ir Vet J (2008)

Growth performance of young stock on farm M.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113882&req=5

Figure 2: Growth performance of young stock on farm M.
Mentions: In Figure 2 the results of the young stock measurement for farm M are given. The dots represent individual animals. Microsoft Excel was used to define a trend line for individual measurements; represented by the black line in Figure 2. The two dashed lines in the figure describe the on-farm tolerances (+ and - 5% trend line = target weight tolerances for young stock growth). From the figure, the deviating animals can be spotted outside the tolerance borders. Four remarkable dots can be seen outside the -5% tolerance border. The farmer was surprised by these findings, but when the deviating animals were identified, it became clear that each of these animals had a specific clinical history and were just marked as small animals. Approximately 10 animals were found to be 'too heavy' (above the +5% tolerance), which confirms the presumption that some of the young stock (older than one year) had a tendency to fatten. These findings are supported by the results from the body condition scoring.

Bottom Line: Until now, an exception has been made for primary producers, but as regulations evolve, on-farm HACCP-like programmes should be ready to assure food safety as well as animal health and animal welfare.The veterinarian is pivotal for the facility-based HACCP team, since he/she has knowledge about on-farm risk assessment and relations between clinical pathology, feed and farm management.The HACCP concept in combination with veterinary herd health and production management programmes offers a promising approach to optimise on-farm production processes (i.e., young stock rearing) in addition to a structural approach for quality risk management on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Utrecht, Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Utrecht, Netherlands. j.s.c.boersema@uu.nl.

ABSTRACT
Driven by consumer demands, European legislation has suggested the use of HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) as the quality risk management programme for the whole dairy chain. Until now, an exception has been made for primary producers, but as regulations evolve, on-farm HACCP-like programmes should be ready to assure food safety as well as animal health and animal welfare. In our field experiment, the HACCP-concept was used to combine both optimal farm management and formalisation of quality assurance in an on-farm situation in the Netherlands. The process of young stock rearing was chosen, since its importance for the future of the farm is often underestimated. Hazards and their associated risk factors can be controlled within the farm-specific standards and tolerances, as targets can be controlled by corrective measures and by implementation of farm-specific worksheets. The veterinarian is pivotal for the facility-based HACCP team, since he/she has knowledge about on-farm risk assessment and relations between clinical pathology, feed and farm management. The HACCP concept in combination with veterinary herd health and production management programmes offers a promising approach to optimise on-farm production processes (i.e., young stock rearing) in addition to a structural approach for quality risk management on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus