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Tuberculosis in alpaca (Lama pacos) on a farm in Ireland. 1. A clinical report.

Ryan E, Dwyer P, Connolly Dj, Fagan J, Costello E, More S - Ir Vet J (2008)

Bottom Line: Two severely debilitated alpaca were presented to the University Veterinary Hospital, University College Dublin in November 2004.On necropsy there were granulomatous lesions present throughout many body organs including lung, liver, kidney, intestine as well on peritoneum and mesentery.Infection due to M. bovis should be considered among the differential diagnoses of debilitating diseases in alpaca, particularly those farmed in areas known to be traditional black spots for tuberculosis in cattle.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Herd and Veterinary Public Health, UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
This case report describes tuberculosis (TB) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in alpaca (Lama pacos) on a farm in Ireland. Two severely debilitated alpaca were presented to the University Veterinary Hospital, University College Dublin in November 2004. Bloods were taken, and haematology and biochemistry results were indicative of chronic infection. Radiological examination showed evidence of diffuse granulomatous pneumonia suggestive of tuberculosis. On necropsy there were granulomatous lesions present throughout many body organs including lung, liver, kidney, intestine as well on peritoneum and mesentery. Culture of acid-fast bacilli from lesions led to a diagnosis of tuberculosis due to M. bovis. The use of intradermal skin testing proved inefficient and unreliable for ante mortem diagnosis of tuberculosis in alpaca. Infection due to M. bovis should be considered among the differential diagnoses of debilitating diseases in alpaca, particularly those farmed in areas known to be traditional black spots for tuberculosis in cattle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

H and E-stained section of lung tissue from alpaca G showing a granuloma with central caseous necrosis (3), surrounded by intense mononuclear cell reaction (2) and fibroblasts (1). (10× magnification.).
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Figure 5: H and E-stained section of lung tissue from alpaca G showing a granuloma with central caseous necrosis (3), surrounded by intense mononuclear cell reaction (2) and fibroblasts (1). (10× magnification.).

Mentions: In the five months to April 2005, a further three ill alpacas died or were euthanased. Alpaca F (Figure 2) presented with mild respiratory symptoms on November 21, 2004, and was euthanased on January 10, 2005. Alpaca G died at pasture on February 15, 2005. Alpaca H presented on February 17, 2005 following progressive loss of weight over a 4-6 week period loss and was euthanased on April 19, 2005. Each of these cases was examined post mortem at the ARVL and had extensive miliary TB from which M. bovis was isolated. A composite post mortem examination report on all five cases indicated that lesions were present in the lung (Figure 3a, b and 3c), pleura, mesentery, spleen, liver, kidney, uterus, as well as bronchial mediastinal, mesenteric and prescapular lymph nodes (Figure 4). Tubercles were identified on histology (Figure 5), which typically had a caseous centre with foci of calcification, surrounded by lymphocytes and macrophages with epithelioid cells on the periphery. There was significant fibroblastic reaction, but giant cells were not seen. Isolates subsequently identified as M. bovis grew rapidly and luxuriantly on specific culture. In one case, the lesions in the lung indicated 'open TB', with caseo-necrotic lesions discharging into bronchioles.


Tuberculosis in alpaca (Lama pacos) on a farm in Ireland. 1. A clinical report.

Ryan E, Dwyer P, Connolly Dj, Fagan J, Costello E, More S - Ir Vet J (2008)

H and E-stained section of lung tissue from alpaca G showing a granuloma with central caseous necrosis (3), surrounded by intense mononuclear cell reaction (2) and fibroblasts (1). (10× magnification.).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113877&req=5

Figure 5: H and E-stained section of lung tissue from alpaca G showing a granuloma with central caseous necrosis (3), surrounded by intense mononuclear cell reaction (2) and fibroblasts (1). (10× magnification.).
Mentions: In the five months to April 2005, a further three ill alpacas died or were euthanased. Alpaca F (Figure 2) presented with mild respiratory symptoms on November 21, 2004, and was euthanased on January 10, 2005. Alpaca G died at pasture on February 15, 2005. Alpaca H presented on February 17, 2005 following progressive loss of weight over a 4-6 week period loss and was euthanased on April 19, 2005. Each of these cases was examined post mortem at the ARVL and had extensive miliary TB from which M. bovis was isolated. A composite post mortem examination report on all five cases indicated that lesions were present in the lung (Figure 3a, b and 3c), pleura, mesentery, spleen, liver, kidney, uterus, as well as bronchial mediastinal, mesenteric and prescapular lymph nodes (Figure 4). Tubercles were identified on histology (Figure 5), which typically had a caseous centre with foci of calcification, surrounded by lymphocytes and macrophages with epithelioid cells on the periphery. There was significant fibroblastic reaction, but giant cells were not seen. Isolates subsequently identified as M. bovis grew rapidly and luxuriantly on specific culture. In one case, the lesions in the lung indicated 'open TB', with caseo-necrotic lesions discharging into bronchioles.

Bottom Line: Two severely debilitated alpaca were presented to the University Veterinary Hospital, University College Dublin in November 2004.On necropsy there were granulomatous lesions present throughout many body organs including lung, liver, kidney, intestine as well on peritoneum and mesentery.Infection due to M. bovis should be considered among the differential diagnoses of debilitating diseases in alpaca, particularly those farmed in areas known to be traditional black spots for tuberculosis in cattle.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Herd and Veterinary Public Health, UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
This case report describes tuberculosis (TB) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in alpaca (Lama pacos) on a farm in Ireland. Two severely debilitated alpaca were presented to the University Veterinary Hospital, University College Dublin in November 2004. Bloods were taken, and haematology and biochemistry results were indicative of chronic infection. Radiological examination showed evidence of diffuse granulomatous pneumonia suggestive of tuberculosis. On necropsy there were granulomatous lesions present throughout many body organs including lung, liver, kidney, intestine as well on peritoneum and mesentery. Culture of acid-fast bacilli from lesions led to a diagnosis of tuberculosis due to M. bovis. The use of intradermal skin testing proved inefficient and unreliable for ante mortem diagnosis of tuberculosis in alpaca. Infection due to M. bovis should be considered among the differential diagnoses of debilitating diseases in alpaca, particularly those farmed in areas known to be traditional black spots for tuberculosis in cattle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus