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Low reproductive performance and high sow mortality in a pig breeding herd: a case study.

Rueda López M - Ir Vet J (2008)

Bottom Line: Pregnancy failures exceeded 20% and sow mortality exceeded 12% for two consecutive years.This programme failed to increase the farrowing rate due to incomplete implementation of the recommendations made.The farrowing rate increased to 86.5% subsequent to a farm manager change in January 2005, which resulted in complete implementation of the control programme.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Kiernan Milling, Veterinary Clinic, Granard, Co, Longford, Ireland. miguel@kiernanmilling.ie.

ABSTRACT
Sow performance is a key component of the productivity of commercial pig farms. Reproductive failure in the sow is common in pig production. For every 100 sows served, 89 should farrow. In absence of specific diseases such as porcine parvovirus, pseudo-rabies, swine fever, leptospirosis and brucellosis, management failures are the most important causes of loss. A syndrome associated with reproductive inefficiency, and post-service vaginal discharge and high sow mortality in a commercial pig farm is described. Pregnancy failures exceeded 20% and sow mortality exceeded 12% for two consecutive years. The abnormal post-service vaginal discharge rate was 1.7% during the period of investigation.An investigation involving an analysis of farm records, a review of breeding management practices, clinical examinations, laboratory analysis and examination of urogenital organs was conducted.The main contributing factors found were a sub-optimal gilt breeding management, an inadequate culling policy in combination with a sub-optimal culling rate and the presence of cystitis in more than 1% of the urogenital organs examined. The high sow mortality rate was related to an aged breeding herd.A control programme was recommended based on management changes involving oestrus detection, movement of gilts post-service, hygiene in the service area, boar exposure post-service and urinary acidification. This programme failed to increase the farrowing rate due to incomplete implementation of the recommendations made. The farrowing rate increased to 86.5% subsequent to a farm manager change in January 2005, which resulted in complete implementation of the control programme.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Service pen used in the unit after September 2003.
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Figure 1: Service pen used in the unit after September 2003.

Mentions: 3. A service pen (Figure 1).


Low reproductive performance and high sow mortality in a pig breeding herd: a case study.

Rueda López M - Ir Vet J (2008)

Service pen used in the unit after September 2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113876&req=5

Figure 1: Service pen used in the unit after September 2003.
Mentions: 3. A service pen (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Pregnancy failures exceeded 20% and sow mortality exceeded 12% for two consecutive years.This programme failed to increase the farrowing rate due to incomplete implementation of the recommendations made.The farrowing rate increased to 86.5% subsequent to a farm manager change in January 2005, which resulted in complete implementation of the control programme.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Kiernan Milling, Veterinary Clinic, Granard, Co, Longford, Ireland. miguel@kiernanmilling.ie.

ABSTRACT
Sow performance is a key component of the productivity of commercial pig farms. Reproductive failure in the sow is common in pig production. For every 100 sows served, 89 should farrow. In absence of specific diseases such as porcine parvovirus, pseudo-rabies, swine fever, leptospirosis and brucellosis, management failures are the most important causes of loss. A syndrome associated with reproductive inefficiency, and post-service vaginal discharge and high sow mortality in a commercial pig farm is described. Pregnancy failures exceeded 20% and sow mortality exceeded 12% for two consecutive years. The abnormal post-service vaginal discharge rate was 1.7% during the period of investigation.An investigation involving an analysis of farm records, a review of breeding management practices, clinical examinations, laboratory analysis and examination of urogenital organs was conducted.The main contributing factors found were a sub-optimal gilt breeding management, an inadequate culling policy in combination with a sub-optimal culling rate and the presence of cystitis in more than 1% of the urogenital organs examined. The high sow mortality rate was related to an aged breeding herd.A control programme was recommended based on management changes involving oestrus detection, movement of gilts post-service, hygiene in the service area, boar exposure post-service and urinary acidification. This programme failed to increase the farrowing rate due to incomplete implementation of the recommendations made. The farrowing rate increased to 86.5% subsequent to a farm manager change in January 2005, which resulted in complete implementation of the control programme.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus