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Dry cow therapy with a non-antibiotic intramammary teat seal - a review.

Crispie F, Flynn J, Ross RP, Hill C, Meaney WJ - Ir Vet J (2004)

Bottom Line: One such therapy involves the application of a non-antibiotic bismuth-based intramammary teat seal designed for use in cows with low cell counts at the end of lactation.Like the keratin plug that forms naturally in teats of cows that have been dried-off, teat seal forms a physical barrier to invading pathogens.To date, a number of independent studies have shown that teat seal is as effective as traditional dry cow antibiotic products in preventing the occurrence of new infection during the dry period in cows with somatic cell counts of ≤200,000 cells ml-1 at drying-off.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Teagasc, Dairy Production Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co Cork. bmeaney@moorepark.teagasc.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Dry cow antibiotic therapy is used to eliminate existing intramammary infections and to prevent new infections in the dry period. It is implemented as part of a total management system known as the 'Five-Point Plan' for mastitis control. Recent public concerns over the widespread prophylactic use of antibiotics, coupled with an increasing interest in organic farming, have lead to a re-evaluation of the treatment of cows at drying-off. As a result, attention has focussed on the use of novel alternatives to antibiotic therapy at the end of lactation. One such therapy involves the application of a non-antibiotic bismuth-based intramammary teat seal designed for use in cows with low cell counts at the end of lactation. Like the keratin plug that forms naturally in teats of cows that have been dried-off, teat seal forms a physical barrier to invading pathogens. To date, a number of independent studies have shown that teat seal is as effective as traditional dry cow antibiotic products in preventing the occurrence of new infection during the dry period in cows with somatic cell counts of ≤200,000 cells ml-1 at drying-off. This paper reviews the efficacy of teat seal in preventing dry period mastitis in both conventional and organic dairying systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rate of new infection after inoculation with 1,200 cfu Strep. dysgalactiae.
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Figure 2: Rate of new infection after inoculation with 1,200 cfu Strep. dysgalactiae.

Mentions: In a third study, the efficacy of teat seal in preventing infection following an artificial challenge with Strep. dysgalactiae was evaluated by Meaney et al. (unpublished data). In this study, 62 infection-free udder quarters in 17 dairy cows were selected at drying-off. Following the last milking of lactation, 31 quarters were infused with teat seal and the remaining 31 were used as untreated controls. Three days after infusion, all teats were inoculated with 1,200 cfu of Strep. dysgalactiae into the teat canal to a depth of 17 mm. The cows were then observed over the next seven days for signs of clinical mastitis. During this period, 20 clinical cases of mastitis developed in the untreated quarters and eight in the quarters infused with teat seal (Table 3). Additionally, new infections appeared more rapidly in untreated teats than in those infused with teal seal (Figure 2). These data indicate that teat seal provided significant protection (p = 0.002) against an artificial challenge with Strep. dysgalactiae, supporting the studies using natural challenge [33,16].


Dry cow therapy with a non-antibiotic intramammary teat seal - a review.

Crispie F, Flynn J, Ross RP, Hill C, Meaney WJ - Ir Vet J (2004)

Rate of new infection after inoculation with 1,200 cfu Strep. dysgalactiae.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113871&req=5

Figure 2: Rate of new infection after inoculation with 1,200 cfu Strep. dysgalactiae.
Mentions: In a third study, the efficacy of teat seal in preventing infection following an artificial challenge with Strep. dysgalactiae was evaluated by Meaney et al. (unpublished data). In this study, 62 infection-free udder quarters in 17 dairy cows were selected at drying-off. Following the last milking of lactation, 31 quarters were infused with teat seal and the remaining 31 were used as untreated controls. Three days after infusion, all teats were inoculated with 1,200 cfu of Strep. dysgalactiae into the teat canal to a depth of 17 mm. The cows were then observed over the next seven days for signs of clinical mastitis. During this period, 20 clinical cases of mastitis developed in the untreated quarters and eight in the quarters infused with teat seal (Table 3). Additionally, new infections appeared more rapidly in untreated teats than in those infused with teal seal (Figure 2). These data indicate that teat seal provided significant protection (p = 0.002) against an artificial challenge with Strep. dysgalactiae, supporting the studies using natural challenge [33,16].

Bottom Line: One such therapy involves the application of a non-antibiotic bismuth-based intramammary teat seal designed for use in cows with low cell counts at the end of lactation.Like the keratin plug that forms naturally in teats of cows that have been dried-off, teat seal forms a physical barrier to invading pathogens.To date, a number of independent studies have shown that teat seal is as effective as traditional dry cow antibiotic products in preventing the occurrence of new infection during the dry period in cows with somatic cell counts of ≤200,000 cells ml-1 at drying-off.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Teagasc, Dairy Production Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co Cork. bmeaney@moorepark.teagasc.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Dry cow antibiotic therapy is used to eliminate existing intramammary infections and to prevent new infections in the dry period. It is implemented as part of a total management system known as the 'Five-Point Plan' for mastitis control. Recent public concerns over the widespread prophylactic use of antibiotics, coupled with an increasing interest in organic farming, have lead to a re-evaluation of the treatment of cows at drying-off. As a result, attention has focussed on the use of novel alternatives to antibiotic therapy at the end of lactation. One such therapy involves the application of a non-antibiotic bismuth-based intramammary teat seal designed for use in cows with low cell counts at the end of lactation. Like the keratin plug that forms naturally in teats of cows that have been dried-off, teat seal forms a physical barrier to invading pathogens. To date, a number of independent studies have shown that teat seal is as effective as traditional dry cow antibiotic products in preventing the occurrence of new infection during the dry period in cows with somatic cell counts of ≤200,000 cells ml-1 at drying-off. This paper reviews the efficacy of teat seal in preventing dry period mastitis in both conventional and organic dairying systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus