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Equine post-breeding endometritis: A review.

Maischberger E, Irwin J, Carrington S, Duggan V - Ir Vet J (2008)

Bottom Line: The resultant fluid and inflammatory products are cleared by 48 hours post cover.To enhance conception rates, mares at high risk need optimal breeding management as well as early diagnosis, followed by the most appropriate treatment.This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of PPBEM and the management of affected mares.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Science Centre, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. eva.maischberger@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
The deposition of semen, bacteria and debris in the uterus of the mare after breeding normally induces a self-limiting endometritis. The resultant fluid and inflammatory products are cleared by 48 hours post cover. Mares that are susceptible to persistent post-breeding endometritis (PPBEM) have impaired uterine defence and clearance mechanisms, making them unable to resolve this inflammation within the normal time. This persists beyond 48 hours post-breeding and causes persistent fluid accumulation within the uterus. Mares with PPBEM have an increased rate of embryonic loss and a lower overall pregnancy rate than those without the condition. To enhance conception rates, mares at high risk need optimal breeding management as well as early diagnosis, followed by the most appropriate treatment. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of PPBEM and the management of affected mares.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A healthy vulva. The labiae of the vulva are symmetrical and the vulva itself is properly closed.
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Figure 1: A healthy vulva. The labiae of the vulva are symmetrical and the vulva itself is properly closed.

Mentions: The vulva, vestibule, vagina and cervix normally act as physical barriers protecting the uterus from external contamination [19,39,32] (Figure 1). There is a higher predisposition towards PPBEM in mares with previous foaling injuries [18], poor perineal conformation [18], altered conformation of the vulva [16] (Figure 2) and incomplete closure or persistent relaxation of the vulvar lips [32,16]. Therefore, the above abnormalities can all affect barrier function, causing air, faeces and urine to enter the reproductive tract [18]. In addition, cervical incompetence has consequences for both barrier function and uterine clearance. It may include either insufficient relaxation during oestrus with impaired cervical drainage [18,31] or improper closure during dioestrus [32], predisposing to bacterial colonisation before breeding.


Equine post-breeding endometritis: A review.

Maischberger E, Irwin J, Carrington S, Duggan V - Ir Vet J (2008)

A healthy vulva. The labiae of the vulva are symmetrical and the vulva itself is properly closed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113865&req=5

Figure 1: A healthy vulva. The labiae of the vulva are symmetrical and the vulva itself is properly closed.
Mentions: The vulva, vestibule, vagina and cervix normally act as physical barriers protecting the uterus from external contamination [19,39,32] (Figure 1). There is a higher predisposition towards PPBEM in mares with previous foaling injuries [18], poor perineal conformation [18], altered conformation of the vulva [16] (Figure 2) and incomplete closure or persistent relaxation of the vulvar lips [32,16]. Therefore, the above abnormalities can all affect barrier function, causing air, faeces and urine to enter the reproductive tract [18]. In addition, cervical incompetence has consequences for both barrier function and uterine clearance. It may include either insufficient relaxation during oestrus with impaired cervical drainage [18,31] or improper closure during dioestrus [32], predisposing to bacterial colonisation before breeding.

Bottom Line: The resultant fluid and inflammatory products are cleared by 48 hours post cover.To enhance conception rates, mares at high risk need optimal breeding management as well as early diagnosis, followed by the most appropriate treatment.This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of PPBEM and the management of affected mares.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Science Centre, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. eva.maischberger@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
The deposition of semen, bacteria and debris in the uterus of the mare after breeding normally induces a self-limiting endometritis. The resultant fluid and inflammatory products are cleared by 48 hours post cover. Mares that are susceptible to persistent post-breeding endometritis (PPBEM) have impaired uterine defence and clearance mechanisms, making them unable to resolve this inflammation within the normal time. This persists beyond 48 hours post-breeding and causes persistent fluid accumulation within the uterus. Mares with PPBEM have an increased rate of embryonic loss and a lower overall pregnancy rate than those without the condition. To enhance conception rates, mares at high risk need optimal breeding management as well as early diagnosis, followed by the most appropriate treatment. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of PPBEM and the management of affected mares.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus