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An investigation into reduced milk production following dietary alteration on an Irish dairy farm.

Geraghty T, O'Grady L, Mulligan FJ - Ir Vet J (2010)

Bottom Line: Immediately following the implementation of the changes there was an unexpected reduction in performance affecting both milk yield and protein concentration.An investigation into the poor performance revealed underestimation of peak milk yield; over-estimation of maize silage quality; a large difference in the concentrate being fed compared to the concentrate recommended, and failure of the blend of concentrate ingredients to maintain the intended proportions in the in-parlour feeding system.This report highlights the challenges in obtaining accurate on-farm data for use in dairy cow nutritional models.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, UCD, Dublin 4, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A nutritional evaluation of an Irish dairy herd indicated gross overfeeding of late lactation cows, over-conditioning of cows at parturition and a high rate of body condition loss in early lactation. Metabolisable-energy based nutritional modelling software was used to guide recommended dietary changes to prevent excessive condition gain in late lactation. Immediately following the implementation of the changes there was an unexpected reduction in performance affecting both milk yield and protein concentration. An investigation into the poor performance revealed underestimation of peak milk yield; over-estimation of maize silage quality; a large difference in the concentrate being fed compared to the concentrate recommended, and failure of the blend of concentrate ingredients to maintain the intended proportions in the in-parlour feeding system. The estimated maximum cumulative effect of these errors was to cause undersupply of energy and protein in the recommended diet of 16% and 3% respectively to cows in early lactation. Use of a net-energy nutritional model would have indicated a requirement for a higher energy supply in this case. This report highlights the challenges in obtaining accurate on-farm data for use in dairy cow nutritional models.

No MeSH data available.


The 2009/2010 calving pattern of the dairy farm investigated and corresponding feed group by stage of lactation (early, late or dry) as on the 29th of January 2010.
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Figure 1: The 2009/2010 calving pattern of the dairy farm investigated and corresponding feed group by stage of lactation (early, late or dry) as on the 29th of January 2010.

Mentions: A visit was conducted to an 80-cow dairy herd on January 29, 2010 to initiate nutritional monitoring. The 2009-2010 calving pattern and lactation status of each cow on the day of the visit is shown in Figure 1. Lactating cows (n = 56) were housed together and fed a single total mixed ration (TMR) ad-libitum plus home blended concentrates in-parlour at two rates for early (n = 26; average days in milk 44; range 3 - 110) and late lactation (n = 30; average days in milk 318; range 150 - 704) cows respectively. Dry cows (n = 20) were housed separately and fed a separate TMR. Details of all diets were gathered from farmer interview and farm records (Table 1).


An investigation into reduced milk production following dietary alteration on an Irish dairy farm.

Geraghty T, O'Grady L, Mulligan FJ - Ir Vet J (2010)

The 2009/2010 calving pattern of the dairy farm investigated and corresponding feed group by stage of lactation (early, late or dry) as on the 29th of January 2010.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113839&req=5

Figure 1: The 2009/2010 calving pattern of the dairy farm investigated and corresponding feed group by stage of lactation (early, late or dry) as on the 29th of January 2010.
Mentions: A visit was conducted to an 80-cow dairy herd on January 29, 2010 to initiate nutritional monitoring. The 2009-2010 calving pattern and lactation status of each cow on the day of the visit is shown in Figure 1. Lactating cows (n = 56) were housed together and fed a single total mixed ration (TMR) ad-libitum plus home blended concentrates in-parlour at two rates for early (n = 26; average days in milk 44; range 3 - 110) and late lactation (n = 30; average days in milk 318; range 150 - 704) cows respectively. Dry cows (n = 20) were housed separately and fed a separate TMR. Details of all diets were gathered from farmer interview and farm records (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Immediately following the implementation of the changes there was an unexpected reduction in performance affecting both milk yield and protein concentration.An investigation into the poor performance revealed underestimation of peak milk yield; over-estimation of maize silage quality; a large difference in the concentrate being fed compared to the concentrate recommended, and failure of the blend of concentrate ingredients to maintain the intended proportions in the in-parlour feeding system.This report highlights the challenges in obtaining accurate on-farm data for use in dairy cow nutritional models.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, UCD, Dublin 4, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A nutritional evaluation of an Irish dairy herd indicated gross overfeeding of late lactation cows, over-conditioning of cows at parturition and a high rate of body condition loss in early lactation. Metabolisable-energy based nutritional modelling software was used to guide recommended dietary changes to prevent excessive condition gain in late lactation. Immediately following the implementation of the changes there was an unexpected reduction in performance affecting both milk yield and protein concentration. An investigation into the poor performance revealed underestimation of peak milk yield; over-estimation of maize silage quality; a large difference in the concentrate being fed compared to the concentrate recommended, and failure of the blend of concentrate ingredients to maintain the intended proportions in the in-parlour feeding system. The estimated maximum cumulative effect of these errors was to cause undersupply of energy and protein in the recommended diet of 16% and 3% respectively to cows in early lactation. Use of a net-energy nutritional model would have indicated a requirement for a higher energy supply in this case. This report highlights the challenges in obtaining accurate on-farm data for use in dairy cow nutritional models.

No MeSH data available.