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Clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of three dogs with angiostrongylosis in Ireland.

Brennan SF, McCarthy G, McAllister H, Bassett H, Jones BR - Ir Vet J (2004)

Bottom Line: : Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale.One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs.Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sheila.brennan@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale. The presenting signs included syncope (one dog), exercise intolerance (two dogs), cough (two dogs), abdominal pain (one dog) and depression (one dog). One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs. Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Widespread interstital pulmonary pattern particularly in the right caudal area. There is a shift of the apex of the heart to the right-hand side suggesting right ventricular enlargement.
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Figure 7: Widespread interstital pulmonary pattern particularly in the right caudal area. There is a shift of the apex of the heart to the right-hand side suggesting right ventricular enlargement.

Mentions: On examination, she was quiet. Heart rate was 96 beats per minute with a sinus rhythm. The dog was in good body condition, weighing 31.1 kg. Rectal temperature was 39.2°C. Her abdomen was tense and abnormalities were not palpated. Routine haematology, a biochemical profile, OPST and APTT were carried out. Faeces was collected for parasitological examination and urine for urinalysis. Blood results are shown in Tables 1 and 2. The urine was dark red/black in colour, which was attributed to haemoglobin and not to myoglobin. Faecal analysis recovered A. vasorum larvae, Capillaria spp. eggs and Uncinaria stenocephala eggs. Abdominal radiographs were taken and abdominal ultrasonography was performed. The abdominal radiographs showed marked ventral displacement of the colon by a soft tissue opacity in the caudal abdomen, ventral to the sublumbar muscle mass (Figure 5). Ultrasonography identified a linear, hypoechoic, septated, lobulated mass, 14 cm long and 8 to 10 cm wide, dorsal to the bladder and extending cranially to the caudal pole of the left kidney. The characteristics of the mass were consistent with an organising haematoma or similar haemorrhagic tissue within the retroperitoneum. Four days later, the abdomen was re-examined by both ultrasonography and radiography. The colon had returned to a normal position (Figure 6), but the hypoechoic mass was still present with anechoic areas present within it, consistent with the appearance of an organising haematoma. Thoracic radiographs showed widespread interstitial infiltration throughout the lung fields and the cardiac axis was shifted to the left on the ventrodorsal view suggesting right-sided cardiac enlargement (Figure 7). Echocardiography was not performed.


Clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of three dogs with angiostrongylosis in Ireland.

Brennan SF, McCarthy G, McAllister H, Bassett H, Jones BR - Ir Vet J (2004)

Widespread interstital pulmonary pattern particularly in the right caudal area. There is a shift of the apex of the heart to the right-hand side suggesting right ventricular enlargement.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113816&req=5

Figure 7: Widespread interstital pulmonary pattern particularly in the right caudal area. There is a shift of the apex of the heart to the right-hand side suggesting right ventricular enlargement.
Mentions: On examination, she was quiet. Heart rate was 96 beats per minute with a sinus rhythm. The dog was in good body condition, weighing 31.1 kg. Rectal temperature was 39.2°C. Her abdomen was tense and abnormalities were not palpated. Routine haematology, a biochemical profile, OPST and APTT were carried out. Faeces was collected for parasitological examination and urine for urinalysis. Blood results are shown in Tables 1 and 2. The urine was dark red/black in colour, which was attributed to haemoglobin and not to myoglobin. Faecal analysis recovered A. vasorum larvae, Capillaria spp. eggs and Uncinaria stenocephala eggs. Abdominal radiographs were taken and abdominal ultrasonography was performed. The abdominal radiographs showed marked ventral displacement of the colon by a soft tissue opacity in the caudal abdomen, ventral to the sublumbar muscle mass (Figure 5). Ultrasonography identified a linear, hypoechoic, septated, lobulated mass, 14 cm long and 8 to 10 cm wide, dorsal to the bladder and extending cranially to the caudal pole of the left kidney. The characteristics of the mass were consistent with an organising haematoma or similar haemorrhagic tissue within the retroperitoneum. Four days later, the abdomen was re-examined by both ultrasonography and radiography. The colon had returned to a normal position (Figure 6), but the hypoechoic mass was still present with anechoic areas present within it, consistent with the appearance of an organising haematoma. Thoracic radiographs showed widespread interstitial infiltration throughout the lung fields and the cardiac axis was shifted to the left on the ventrodorsal view suggesting right-sided cardiac enlargement (Figure 7). Echocardiography was not performed.

Bottom Line: : Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale.One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs.Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sheila.brennan@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale. The presenting signs included syncope (one dog), exercise intolerance (two dogs), cough (two dogs), abdominal pain (one dog) and depression (one dog). One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs. Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus