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Clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of three dogs with angiostrongylosis in Ireland.

Brennan SF, McCarthy G, McAllister H, Bassett H, Jones BR - Ir Vet J (2004)

Bottom Line: : Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale.One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs.Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sheila.brennan@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale. The presenting signs included syncope (one dog), exercise intolerance (two dogs), cough (two dogs), abdominal pain (one dog) and depression (one dog). One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs. Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adult Angiostrongylus vasorum (arrows) within pulmonary vessels of formalin-fixed lung.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Adult Angiostrongylus vasorum (arrows) within pulmonary vessels of formalin-fixed lung.

Mentions: The adult worms parasitise the right side of the heart and the pulmonary arteries (Figure 1). Eggs released from the adult female are transported to the pulmonary capillaries where they hatch. The first stage L1 larvae penetrate the capillary and alveolar walls to enter the airway, from where they are coughed into the pharynx and swallowed. They are excreted in faeces and the intermediate hosts (slugs and snails) ingest the larvae whilst foraging in the faeces. Bolt et al. [1] showed that the common frog (Rana temporaria) might act as a paratenic and also as an intermediate host for A. vasorum. Whilst in the intermediate host the larvae develop to the L3 stage. The canine host is infected when it ingests the L3 larvae. Once ingested, L3 larvae penetrate the walls of the gastrointestinal tract [1] and invade the mesenteric, portal and caecocolic lymph nodes where they develop to the L5 larval stage [17]. From the lymph nodes, migration to the right heart and pulmonary arteries occurs via the hepatic portal vein, liver and caudal vena cava [1]. This final migration and maturation to adulthood takes approximately 10 days to complete [17]. The prepatent period is approximately 38 to 57 days [1].


Clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of three dogs with angiostrongylosis in Ireland.

Brennan SF, McCarthy G, McAllister H, Bassett H, Jones BR - Ir Vet J (2004)

Adult Angiostrongylus vasorum (arrows) within pulmonary vessels of formalin-fixed lung.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113816&req=5

Figure 1: Adult Angiostrongylus vasorum (arrows) within pulmonary vessels of formalin-fixed lung.
Mentions: The adult worms parasitise the right side of the heart and the pulmonary arteries (Figure 1). Eggs released from the adult female are transported to the pulmonary capillaries where they hatch. The first stage L1 larvae penetrate the capillary and alveolar walls to enter the airway, from where they are coughed into the pharynx and swallowed. They are excreted in faeces and the intermediate hosts (slugs and snails) ingest the larvae whilst foraging in the faeces. Bolt et al. [1] showed that the common frog (Rana temporaria) might act as a paratenic and also as an intermediate host for A. vasorum. Whilst in the intermediate host the larvae develop to the L3 stage. The canine host is infected when it ingests the L3 larvae. Once ingested, L3 larvae penetrate the walls of the gastrointestinal tract [1] and invade the mesenteric, portal and caecocolic lymph nodes where they develop to the L5 larval stage [17]. From the lymph nodes, migration to the right heart and pulmonary arteries occurs via the hepatic portal vein, liver and caudal vena cava [1]. This final migration and maturation to adulthood takes approximately 10 days to complete [17]. The prepatent period is approximately 38 to 57 days [1].

Bottom Line: : Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale.One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs.Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sheila.brennan@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale. The presenting signs included syncope (one dog), exercise intolerance (two dogs), cough (two dogs), abdominal pain (one dog) and depression (one dog). One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs. Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus