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Surgical management of 43 cases of chronic otitis externa in the dog.

Doyle RS, Skelly C, Bellenger CR - Ir Vet J (2004)

Bottom Line: Lateral ear canal resection (LECR) was undertaken in nine of the 43 dogs: results were unsatisfactory, with a failure of the surgery in five of eight dogs and one dog lost to follow-up.Once end-stage otitis externa, with or without otitis media, is diagnosed, total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy (TECA/LBO) is the best treatment option.Complications following all procedures were most common in cases with a concurrent dermatopathy; therefore, definitive diagnosis and medical treatment for skin and ear disease is essential.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Over a seven-year period, chronic otitis externa was surgically managed in 43 dogs at the University Veterinary Hospital of University College Dublin. Lateral ear canal resection (LECR) was undertaken in nine of the 43 dogs: results were unsatisfactory, with a failure of the surgery in five of eight dogs and one dog lost to follow-up. Once end-stage otitis externa, with or without otitis media, is diagnosed, total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy (TECA/LBO) is the best treatment option. In this series, 37 of 43 dogs underwent TECA/LBO and of the 29 dogs for which follow-up results were obtained 27 (93%) had an excellent or improved outcome to surgery. Complications following all procedures were most common in cases with a concurrent dermatopathy; therefore, definitive diagnosis and medical treatment for skin and ear disease is essential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rostro-caudal skull radiograph of Case 20. Arrow indicates thickening of right tympanic bulla wall suggestive of otitis media. Arrowhead indicates normal left tympanic bulla.
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Figure 2: Rostro-caudal skull radiograph of Case 20. Arrow indicates thickening of right tympanic bulla wall suggestive of otitis media. Arrowhead indicates normal left tympanic bulla.

Mentions: Pre-operative evaluation included history, general physical examination, clinical signs, duration of clinical signs and response to previous medication. Haematological and serum biochemical examinations were performed prior to anaesthesia in all dogs greater than five years of age or in dogs with suspected concomitant disease. Otoscopic examination was performed in all cases with the dog under sedation or general anaesthesia. Skull radiography was performed in certain cases to determine the extent of changes within the horizontal ear canal and tympanic bulla. Standard views included dorso-ventral, lateral, lateral oblique and rostro-caudal (open-mouth: Figure 2) projections. A board-certified radiologist assessed all radiographs. In the majority of cases, specimens for microbiological examination (smears for Gram stain, bacteriological culture and susceptibility to antibiotics) were taken at surgery from either the horizontal canal (LECR) or the tympanic bulla (TECA/LBO). Histopathology was performed on excised tissue where there was a suspicion of neoplasia (such as abnormal masses within the ear canal). Concurrent dermatopathy was defined as the presence of dermatological lesions not affecting the ear canal.


Surgical management of 43 cases of chronic otitis externa in the dog.

Doyle RS, Skelly C, Bellenger CR - Ir Vet J (2004)

Rostro-caudal skull radiograph of Case 20. Arrow indicates thickening of right tympanic bulla wall suggestive of otitis media. Arrowhead indicates normal left tympanic bulla.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113813&req=5

Figure 2: Rostro-caudal skull radiograph of Case 20. Arrow indicates thickening of right tympanic bulla wall suggestive of otitis media. Arrowhead indicates normal left tympanic bulla.
Mentions: Pre-operative evaluation included history, general physical examination, clinical signs, duration of clinical signs and response to previous medication. Haematological and serum biochemical examinations were performed prior to anaesthesia in all dogs greater than five years of age or in dogs with suspected concomitant disease. Otoscopic examination was performed in all cases with the dog under sedation or general anaesthesia. Skull radiography was performed in certain cases to determine the extent of changes within the horizontal ear canal and tympanic bulla. Standard views included dorso-ventral, lateral, lateral oblique and rostro-caudal (open-mouth: Figure 2) projections. A board-certified radiologist assessed all radiographs. In the majority of cases, specimens for microbiological examination (smears for Gram stain, bacteriological culture and susceptibility to antibiotics) were taken at surgery from either the horizontal canal (LECR) or the tympanic bulla (TECA/LBO). Histopathology was performed on excised tissue where there was a suspicion of neoplasia (such as abnormal masses within the ear canal). Concurrent dermatopathy was defined as the presence of dermatological lesions not affecting the ear canal.

Bottom Line: Lateral ear canal resection (LECR) was undertaken in nine of the 43 dogs: results were unsatisfactory, with a failure of the surgery in five of eight dogs and one dog lost to follow-up.Once end-stage otitis externa, with or without otitis media, is diagnosed, total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy (TECA/LBO) is the best treatment option.Complications following all procedures were most common in cases with a concurrent dermatopathy; therefore, definitive diagnosis and medical treatment for skin and ear disease is essential.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ronan.doyle@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
: Over a seven-year period, chronic otitis externa was surgically managed in 43 dogs at the University Veterinary Hospital of University College Dublin. Lateral ear canal resection (LECR) was undertaken in nine of the 43 dogs: results were unsatisfactory, with a failure of the surgery in five of eight dogs and one dog lost to follow-up. Once end-stage otitis externa, with or without otitis media, is diagnosed, total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy (TECA/LBO) is the best treatment option. In this series, 37 of 43 dogs underwent TECA/LBO and of the 29 dogs for which follow-up results were obtained 27 (93%) had an excellent or improved outcome to surgery. Complications following all procedures were most common in cases with a concurrent dermatopathy; therefore, definitive diagnosis and medical treatment for skin and ear disease is essential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus