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Sedentary behavior is not associated with cardiometabolic risk in adults with abdominal obesity.

McGuire KA, Ross R - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: SED and physical activity were determined by accelerometry over 7 days and summarized as SED (accelerometer counts/min <100), LPA (counts/min 100-1951), and MVPA (counts/min ≥1952).Participants spent 627.2±82.9 min/d in SED, 289.0±91.7 min/d in LPA and 19.2±13.5 min/d in MVPA.In secondary analyses, SED was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); with the exception of blood pressure (p<0.05), LPA was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); and MVPA was independently associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to determine whether time spent in sedentary behaviors (SED) was associated with 2-hour glucose and insulin resistance in adults with abdominal obesity. We also examined the association between light physical activity (LPA) and sporadic (accumulated in bouts <10 minutes in duration) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with glucose metabolism.

Methods: Participants were 135 inactive, abdominally obese adults recruited from Kingston, Canada. SED and physical activity were determined by accelerometry over 7 days and summarized as SED (accelerometer counts/min <100), LPA (counts/min 100-1951), and MVPA (counts/min ≥1952). A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was used to ascertain 2-hour glucose; the homeostasis model of assessment was used to determine insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); lipid, lipoproteins and blood pressure were determined using standard protocols. Secondary analyses considered the association between SED and physical activity with other cardiometabolic risk factors.

Results: Participants spent 627.2±82.9 min/d in SED, 289.0±91.7 min/d in LPA and 19.2±13.5 min/d in MVPA. Neither SED nor the physical activity variables were associated with 2-hour glucose or HOMA-IR (p>0.05). In secondary analyses, SED was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); with the exception of blood pressure (p<0.05), LPA was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); and MVPA was independently associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Objectively measured SED was not associated with 2-hr glucose or HOMA-IR. Our findings also suggest that the accumulation of LPA and sporadic MVPA is not associated with glucose metabolism in adults with abdominal obesity.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Associations of 2-hour glucose, sedentary behavior and physical activity.Association of (A) 2-hour glucose (mmol/L) with (B) sedentary behavior (min/d) and (C) light physical activity (min/d) for each individual participant.
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pone-0020503-g001: Associations of 2-hour glucose, sedentary behavior and physical activity.Association of (A) 2-hour glucose (mmol/L) with (B) sedentary behavior (min/d) and (C) light physical activity (min/d) for each individual participant.

Mentions: Neither SED nor the physical activity variables were associated with 2-hour glucose or HOMA-IR (p>0.05). Results were the same regardless of whether SED and the physical activity variables were expressed in absolute or relative terms (Tables 2 and 3). Results were not different for TPA (data not shown). To further illustrate the relationship between SED, PA and 2-hour glucose, individual data were plotted in ascending order for 2-hour glucose along with the corresponding data, in the same order, for both SED and LPA. As illustrated in Figure 1, with increasing 2-hour glucose, there is no clear corresponding increase in SED or decrease in LPA.


Sedentary behavior is not associated with cardiometabolic risk in adults with abdominal obesity.

McGuire KA, Ross R - PLoS ONE (2011)

Associations of 2-hour glucose, sedentary behavior and physical activity.Association of (A) 2-hour glucose (mmol/L) with (B) sedentary behavior (min/d) and (C) light physical activity (min/d) for each individual participant.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113795&req=5

pone-0020503-g001: Associations of 2-hour glucose, sedentary behavior and physical activity.Association of (A) 2-hour glucose (mmol/L) with (B) sedentary behavior (min/d) and (C) light physical activity (min/d) for each individual participant.
Mentions: Neither SED nor the physical activity variables were associated with 2-hour glucose or HOMA-IR (p>0.05). Results were the same regardless of whether SED and the physical activity variables were expressed in absolute or relative terms (Tables 2 and 3). Results were not different for TPA (data not shown). To further illustrate the relationship between SED, PA and 2-hour glucose, individual data were plotted in ascending order for 2-hour glucose along with the corresponding data, in the same order, for both SED and LPA. As illustrated in Figure 1, with increasing 2-hour glucose, there is no clear corresponding increase in SED or decrease in LPA.

Bottom Line: SED and physical activity were determined by accelerometry over 7 days and summarized as SED (accelerometer counts/min <100), LPA (counts/min 100-1951), and MVPA (counts/min ≥1952).Participants spent 627.2±82.9 min/d in SED, 289.0±91.7 min/d in LPA and 19.2±13.5 min/d in MVPA.In secondary analyses, SED was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); with the exception of blood pressure (p<0.05), LPA was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); and MVPA was independently associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to determine whether time spent in sedentary behaviors (SED) was associated with 2-hour glucose and insulin resistance in adults with abdominal obesity. We also examined the association between light physical activity (LPA) and sporadic (accumulated in bouts <10 minutes in duration) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with glucose metabolism.

Methods: Participants were 135 inactive, abdominally obese adults recruited from Kingston, Canada. SED and physical activity were determined by accelerometry over 7 days and summarized as SED (accelerometer counts/min <100), LPA (counts/min 100-1951), and MVPA (counts/min ≥1952). A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was used to ascertain 2-hour glucose; the homeostasis model of assessment was used to determine insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); lipid, lipoproteins and blood pressure were determined using standard protocols. Secondary analyses considered the association between SED and physical activity with other cardiometabolic risk factors.

Results: Participants spent 627.2±82.9 min/d in SED, 289.0±91.7 min/d in LPA and 19.2±13.5 min/d in MVPA. Neither SED nor the physical activity variables were associated with 2-hour glucose or HOMA-IR (p>0.05). In secondary analyses, SED was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); with the exception of blood pressure (p<0.05), LPA was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); and MVPA was independently associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Objectively measured SED was not associated with 2-hr glucose or HOMA-IR. Our findings also suggest that the accumulation of LPA and sporadic MVPA is not associated with glucose metabolism in adults with abdominal obesity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus