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Survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of Irish cattle.

Ashe S, More S, O'Keeffe J, White P, McGrath G, Aznar I - Ir Vet J (2009)

Bottom Line: At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively.The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy).Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Veterinary Epidemiology and Risk Analysis, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sean.ashe@agriculture.gov.ie.

ABSTRACT
An understanding of livestock movement is critical to effective disease prevention, control and prediction. However, livestock movement in Ireland has not yet been quantified. This study has sought to define the survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000. The cohort was observed for a maximum of four years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. Beef and dairy animals moved an average 1.31 and 0.83 times, respectively. At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively. Beef animals werae dispersed to all Irish counties, but mainly to Cork, Limerick, Tipperary and Galway. Dairy animals mainly moved to Cork, Limerick, and Tipperary, with less animals going to Galway, Meath and Kilkenny. The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy). Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

No MeSH data available.


The location, on January 1, 2002, of beef cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 5: The location, on January 1, 2002, of beef cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000.

Mentions: The dispersal of beef animals during the study period is presented in Figures 5 and 6. Beef cattle moved an average of 49.4 kilometres per farm-to-farm move (median 20 km, min. <1 km, 25th and 75th percentiles 7 and 49 km, max. 321 km). Dairy cattle moved an average of 44.6 kilometres per farm-to-farm move (median 19 km, min. <1 km, 25th and 75th percentiles 6 and 50 km, max. 326 km).


Survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of Irish cattle.

Ashe S, More S, O'Keeffe J, White P, McGrath G, Aznar I - Ir Vet J (2009)

The location, on January 1, 2002, of beef cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113782&req=5

Figure 5: The location, on January 1, 2002, of beef cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000.
Mentions: The dispersal of beef animals during the study period is presented in Figures 5 and 6. Beef cattle moved an average of 49.4 kilometres per farm-to-farm move (median 20 km, min. <1 km, 25th and 75th percentiles 7 and 49 km, max. 321 km). Dairy cattle moved an average of 44.6 kilometres per farm-to-farm move (median 19 km, min. <1 km, 25th and 75th percentiles 6 and 50 km, max. 326 km).

Bottom Line: At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively.The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy).Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Veterinary Epidemiology and Risk Analysis, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sean.ashe@agriculture.gov.ie.

ABSTRACT
An understanding of livestock movement is critical to effective disease prevention, control and prediction. However, livestock movement in Ireland has not yet been quantified. This study has sought to define the survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000. The cohort was observed for a maximum of four years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. Beef and dairy animals moved an average 1.31 and 0.83 times, respectively. At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively. Beef animals werae dispersed to all Irish counties, but mainly to Cork, Limerick, Tipperary and Galway. Dairy animals mainly moved to Cork, Limerick, and Tipperary, with less animals going to Galway, Meath and Kilkenny. The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy). Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

No MeSH data available.