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Survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of Irish cattle.

Ashe S, More S, O'Keeffe J, White P, McGrath G, Aznar I - Ir Vet J (2009)

Bottom Line: At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively.The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy).Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Veterinary Epidemiology and Risk Analysis, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sean.ashe@agriculture.gov.ie.

ABSTRACT
An understanding of livestock movement is critical to effective disease prevention, control and prediction. However, livestock movement in Ireland has not yet been quantified. This study has sought to define the survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000. The cohort was observed for a maximum of four years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. Beef and dairy animals moved an average 1.31 and 0.83 times, respectively. At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively. Beef animals werae dispersed to all Irish counties, but mainly to Cork, Limerick, Tipperary and Galway. Dairy animals mainly moved to Cork, Limerick, and Tipperary, with less animals going to Galway, Meath and Kilkenny. The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy). Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

No MeSH data available.


The cumulative probability of survival of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000, by production type.
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Figure 2: The cumulative probability of survival of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000, by production type.

Mentions: At the end of the study period, 19,815 (18.8%) beef animals were alive on Irish farms, including 7,000 (6.7%) animals that had never moved from their premises of birth. Of these latter animals, 5,845 (83.5%) were female. A further 64,155 (61%) beef animals were slaughtered prior to study end, 3,696 (3.5%) died on-farm and 17,477 (16.7%) were exported. During the study period, 14,068 (35.1%) of the dairy cohort were slaughtered, 1,577 (3.2%) died on-farm and 4,963 (13.2%) were exported. A total of 19,460 (48.6%) of the dairy animals survived on Irish farms until the end of the study, including 11,235 (27.7%) of all dairy animals which never moved from their premises of birth. A total of 10,755 (95.7% of these latter) animals were female. The cumulative probability of survival is presented in Table 1 and Figures 2, 3, 4. Figure 2 shows the changes in the cumulative probability of survival of the study group by production type over the study period, Figure 3 the survival of dairy cattle by sex and Figure 4 the survival of beef cattle by sex. Survival is longest in female dairy cattle (cumulative probability of surviving to four years of age, 0.72) and shortest in male beef cattle (0.07). There is a steep decline in probability of survival for male cattle between two and two-and-a-half years of age. In contrast, dairy females show a very gradual decrease in their probability of survival throughout the study period. The survival probability of dairy (Figure 3) and beef (Figure 4) male animals was similar, declining sharply between two and two-and-a-half years of age, in agreement with known industry slaughtering practices. The survival probability of female beef animals to four years of age was 0.38 (Table 1); the balance were slaughtered at an earlier age than their male counterparts (Figure 4), given that they mature earlier.


Survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of Irish cattle.

Ashe S, More S, O'Keeffe J, White P, McGrath G, Aznar I - Ir Vet J (2009)

The cumulative probability of survival of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000, by production type.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113782&req=5

Figure 2: The cumulative probability of survival of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000, by production type.
Mentions: At the end of the study period, 19,815 (18.8%) beef animals were alive on Irish farms, including 7,000 (6.7%) animals that had never moved from their premises of birth. Of these latter animals, 5,845 (83.5%) were female. A further 64,155 (61%) beef animals were slaughtered prior to study end, 3,696 (3.5%) died on-farm and 17,477 (16.7%) were exported. During the study period, 14,068 (35.1%) of the dairy cohort were slaughtered, 1,577 (3.2%) died on-farm and 4,963 (13.2%) were exported. A total of 19,460 (48.6%) of the dairy animals survived on Irish farms until the end of the study, including 11,235 (27.7%) of all dairy animals which never moved from their premises of birth. A total of 10,755 (95.7% of these latter) animals were female. The cumulative probability of survival is presented in Table 1 and Figures 2, 3, 4. Figure 2 shows the changes in the cumulative probability of survival of the study group by production type over the study period, Figure 3 the survival of dairy cattle by sex and Figure 4 the survival of beef cattle by sex. Survival is longest in female dairy cattle (cumulative probability of surviving to four years of age, 0.72) and shortest in male beef cattle (0.07). There is a steep decline in probability of survival for male cattle between two and two-and-a-half years of age. In contrast, dairy females show a very gradual decrease in their probability of survival throughout the study period. The survival probability of dairy (Figure 3) and beef (Figure 4) male animals was similar, declining sharply between two and two-and-a-half years of age, in agreement with known industry slaughtering practices. The survival probability of female beef animals to four years of age was 0.38 (Table 1); the balance were slaughtered at an earlier age than their male counterparts (Figure 4), given that they mature earlier.

Bottom Line: At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively.The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy).Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Veterinary Epidemiology and Risk Analysis, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. sean.ashe@agriculture.gov.ie.

ABSTRACT
An understanding of livestock movement is critical to effective disease prevention, control and prediction. However, livestock movement in Ireland has not yet been quantified. This study has sought to define the survival and dispersal of a defined cohort of cattle born in Co. Kerry during 2000. The cohort was observed for a maximum of four years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. Beef and dairy animals moved an average 1.31 and 0.83 times, respectively. At study end, 18.8% of the beef animals remained alive on Irish farms, including 6.7% at the farm-of-birth, compared with 48.6% and 27.7% for dairy animals respectively. Beef animals werae dispersed to all Irish counties, but mainly to Cork, Limerick, Tipperary and Galway. Dairy animals mainly moved to Cork, Limerick, and Tipperary, with less animals going to Galway, Meath and Kilkenny. The four-year survival probability was 0.07 (male beef animals), 0.25 (male dairy), 0.38 (female beef), and 0.72 (female dairy). Although there was considerable dispersal, the number of moves per animal was less than expected.

No MeSH data available.