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Omentalisation as adjunctive treatment of an infected femoral nonunion fracture: a case report.

McAlinden A, Glyde M, McAllister H, Kirby B - Ir Vet J (2009)

Bottom Line: A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft.Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness.To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University Veterinary Hospital, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4. aidan.mcalinden@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft. Osseous union was documented radiographically 16 weeks after surgery. Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sixteen week postoperative craniocaudal radiograph of the right femur demonstrating bone union.
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Figure 3: Sixteen week postoperative craniocaudal radiograph of the right femur demonstrating bone union.

Mentions: The patient was re-examined at four weekly intervals for 16 weeks. On clinical examination four weeks postoperatively, the dog was consistently using the right pelvic limb and demonstrated a moderate weight bearing lameness. The muscle atrophy noted preoperatively remained. Orthogonal radiographs of the right femur revealed minimal bone reactivity when compared to the postoperative studies. At eight weeks, the lameness had improved and there was increased right thigh muscle mass but minimal radiographic changes remained. At 16 weeks, the dog demonstrated only a mild residual lameness and there was clinical and radiographic evidence of bone union (Figure 3). At one year, the owner reported the dog had returned to normal work without lameness.


Omentalisation as adjunctive treatment of an infected femoral nonunion fracture: a case report.

McAlinden A, Glyde M, McAllister H, Kirby B - Ir Vet J (2009)

Sixteen week postoperative craniocaudal radiograph of the right femur demonstrating bone union.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113780&req=5

Figure 3: Sixteen week postoperative craniocaudal radiograph of the right femur demonstrating bone union.
Mentions: The patient was re-examined at four weekly intervals for 16 weeks. On clinical examination four weeks postoperatively, the dog was consistently using the right pelvic limb and demonstrated a moderate weight bearing lameness. The muscle atrophy noted preoperatively remained. Orthogonal radiographs of the right femur revealed minimal bone reactivity when compared to the postoperative studies. At eight weeks, the lameness had improved and there was increased right thigh muscle mass but minimal radiographic changes remained. At 16 weeks, the dog demonstrated only a mild residual lameness and there was clinical and radiographic evidence of bone union (Figure 3). At one year, the owner reported the dog had returned to normal work without lameness.

Bottom Line: A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft.Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness.To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University Veterinary Hospital, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4. aidan.mcalinden@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft. Osseous union was documented radiographically 16 weeks after surgery. Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus