Limits...
Omentalisation as adjunctive treatment of an infected femoral nonunion fracture: a case report.

McAlinden A, Glyde M, McAllister H, Kirby B - Ir Vet J (2009)

Bottom Line: A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft.Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness.To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University Veterinary Hospital, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4. aidan.mcalinden@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft. Osseous union was documented radiographically 16 weeks after surgery. Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoperative photograph showing the application of a 13 hole, 3.5 mm broad supracondylar femoral bone plate to the lateral aspect of the right femur to provide fracture stability. Four bicortical screws were placed in the proximal fragment and five in the distal fragment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113780&req=5

Figure 2: Intraoperative photograph showing the application of a 13 hole, 3.5 mm broad supracondylar femoral bone plate to the lateral aspect of the right femur to provide fracture stability. Four bicortical screws were placed in the proximal fragment and five in the distal fragment.

Mentions: The plate and remaining screws were removed following gentle elevation of omentum from the lateral aspect of the femur. A 13 hole, 3.5 mm, broad supracondylar femoral bone plate (Veterinary Instrumentation, Sheffield UK) was applied to the lateral aspect of the femur. Ten cortices were achieved distally using five bicortical screws and eight cortices proximally using four bone screws. There were four vacant screw holes over the fracture site (Figure 2). A cancellous bone graft was harvested from the proximal right humerus using a separate set of surgical equipment. The graft was gently packed into the fracture site underneath the omentum. The wound was closed routinely and immediate postoperative radiographs were obtained. The analgesic regime was identical to that used after the first stage of the procedure. The dog was discharged five days postoperatively and the owner was asked to limit exercise to short controlled lead walks and to perform passive range of motion exercises of the stifle and hip joints four times daily. Enrofloxacin 5 mg/kg and meloxicam 0.1 mg/kg were continued once daily per os for a total of 30 days.


Omentalisation as adjunctive treatment of an infected femoral nonunion fracture: a case report.

McAlinden A, Glyde M, McAllister H, Kirby B - Ir Vet J (2009)

Intraoperative photograph showing the application of a 13 hole, 3.5 mm broad supracondylar femoral bone plate to the lateral aspect of the right femur to provide fracture stability. Four bicortical screws were placed in the proximal fragment and five in the distal fragment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113780&req=5

Figure 2: Intraoperative photograph showing the application of a 13 hole, 3.5 mm broad supracondylar femoral bone plate to the lateral aspect of the right femur to provide fracture stability. Four bicortical screws were placed in the proximal fragment and five in the distal fragment.
Mentions: The plate and remaining screws were removed following gentle elevation of omentum from the lateral aspect of the femur. A 13 hole, 3.5 mm, broad supracondylar femoral bone plate (Veterinary Instrumentation, Sheffield UK) was applied to the lateral aspect of the femur. Ten cortices were achieved distally using five bicortical screws and eight cortices proximally using four bone screws. There were four vacant screw holes over the fracture site (Figure 2). A cancellous bone graft was harvested from the proximal right humerus using a separate set of surgical equipment. The graft was gently packed into the fracture site underneath the omentum. The wound was closed routinely and immediate postoperative radiographs were obtained. The analgesic regime was identical to that used after the first stage of the procedure. The dog was discharged five days postoperatively and the owner was asked to limit exercise to short controlled lead walks and to perform passive range of motion exercises of the stifle and hip joints four times daily. Enrofloxacin 5 mg/kg and meloxicam 0.1 mg/kg were continued once daily per os for a total of 30 days.

Bottom Line: A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft.Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness.To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University Veterinary Hospital, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4. aidan.mcalinden@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft. Osseous union was documented radiographically 16 weeks after surgery. Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus