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An outbreak of tuberculosis affecting cattle and people on an Irish dairy farm, following the consumption of raw milk.

Doran P, Carson J, Costello E, More S - Ir Vet J (2009)

Bottom Line: This case highlights the risks associated with the consumption of raw milk.In this family, TB has had a very significant impact on the health of two young children.New strategies are needed, in partnership with industry, to address this important issue. bovine tuberculosis, Ireland, mastitis, milk, Mycobacterium bovis, pasteurisation, TB, zoonosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: District Veterinary Office, Enniscorthy, Co, Wexford, Ireland. paul.doran@agriculture.gov.ie.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Bovine tuberculosis is an ongoing problem in Ireland, and herd incidence has remained at approximately 5% for some years. Spillover of infection from cattle to people remains an ever-present possibility, given the ongoing pool of infection in the Irish cattle population. This paper describes an outbreak of tuberculosis affecting cattle and people on a dairy farm in southeastern Ireland following the consumption of milk from a seven-year-old cow with tuberculous mastitis. Twenty-five of 28 calves born during autumn 2004 and spring 2005 were subsequently identified as TB reactors, and five of six family members were positive on the Mantoux test. During 2005, milk from this cow had mainly been used to feed calves, and was added only occasionally to the bulk tank. Therefore, the calves each received infected milk on an almost continuous basis between birth and weaning. The family collected milk from the bulk milk tank, and consumed it without pasteurisation. This case highlights the risks associated with the consumption of raw milk. In this family, TB has had a very significant impact on the health of two young children. These risks are well recognised, and relevant information for farmers is available. It is of concern, therefore, that raw milk consumption remains prevalent on Irish farms. New strategies are needed, in partnership with industry, to address this important issue.

Keywords: bovine tuberculosis, Ireland, mastitis, milk, Mycobacterium bovis, pasteurisation, TB, zoonosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The annual management of cattle on the case farm.
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Figure 2: The annual management of cattle on the case farm.

Mentions: Farm management was consistent from year to year (Figure 2). The milking cows remained on the home farm (Fragment 1) throughout the year, including a period of housing each winter (from November to March: adult winter housing). The cows calved in either spring or autumn, and the calves were held with their dam for approximately one week following birth. Autumn-born and early spring-born calves were housed (in designated calf housing in batches of three to four similar-aged calves, well-separated from other animals) from soon-following-birth until late April/early May, then turned out to pasture on Fragment 1 (May to September, designated pasture separate from the milking cows) and Fragment 4 (October to November, post-silage production). Late spring-born calves were added to this group during late spring and summer. During housing and prior to weaning, calves were fed hay, and approximately 1 kg of calf concentrate ration and five litres of 'discard' milk per day (from cows immediately post-calving, those with mastitis or high somatic cell count, and those with milk withheld due to medicine withhold requirements). Yearling animals were also held in adult cattle housing on Fragment 1, but grazed pasture on Fragment 2 during spring and summer. Older (two-year-old) steers were housed for fattening. During winter housing, adult cattle were fed silage and rolled barley (each home-grown) and housed in a line of pens (in order: two-year-old steers, yearlings, dry cows, milking cows) under a common roof. There was ready contact between animals in adjacent pens, but not otherwise.


An outbreak of tuberculosis affecting cattle and people on an Irish dairy farm, following the consumption of raw milk.

Doran P, Carson J, Costello E, More S - Ir Vet J (2009)

The annual management of cattle on the case farm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113750&req=5

Figure 2: The annual management of cattle on the case farm.
Mentions: Farm management was consistent from year to year (Figure 2). The milking cows remained on the home farm (Fragment 1) throughout the year, including a period of housing each winter (from November to March: adult winter housing). The cows calved in either spring or autumn, and the calves were held with their dam for approximately one week following birth. Autumn-born and early spring-born calves were housed (in designated calf housing in batches of three to four similar-aged calves, well-separated from other animals) from soon-following-birth until late April/early May, then turned out to pasture on Fragment 1 (May to September, designated pasture separate from the milking cows) and Fragment 4 (October to November, post-silage production). Late spring-born calves were added to this group during late spring and summer. During housing and prior to weaning, calves were fed hay, and approximately 1 kg of calf concentrate ration and five litres of 'discard' milk per day (from cows immediately post-calving, those with mastitis or high somatic cell count, and those with milk withheld due to medicine withhold requirements). Yearling animals were also held in adult cattle housing on Fragment 1, but grazed pasture on Fragment 2 during spring and summer. Older (two-year-old) steers were housed for fattening. During winter housing, adult cattle were fed silage and rolled barley (each home-grown) and housed in a line of pens (in order: two-year-old steers, yearlings, dry cows, milking cows) under a common roof. There was ready contact between animals in adjacent pens, but not otherwise.

Bottom Line: This case highlights the risks associated with the consumption of raw milk.In this family, TB has had a very significant impact on the health of two young children.New strategies are needed, in partnership with industry, to address this important issue. bovine tuberculosis, Ireland, mastitis, milk, Mycobacterium bovis, pasteurisation, TB, zoonosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: District Veterinary Office, Enniscorthy, Co, Wexford, Ireland. paul.doran@agriculture.gov.ie.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Bovine tuberculosis is an ongoing problem in Ireland, and herd incidence has remained at approximately 5% for some years. Spillover of infection from cattle to people remains an ever-present possibility, given the ongoing pool of infection in the Irish cattle population. This paper describes an outbreak of tuberculosis affecting cattle and people on a dairy farm in southeastern Ireland following the consumption of milk from a seven-year-old cow with tuberculous mastitis. Twenty-five of 28 calves born during autumn 2004 and spring 2005 were subsequently identified as TB reactors, and five of six family members were positive on the Mantoux test. During 2005, milk from this cow had mainly been used to feed calves, and was added only occasionally to the bulk tank. Therefore, the calves each received infected milk on an almost continuous basis between birth and weaning. The family collected milk from the bulk milk tank, and consumed it without pasteurisation. This case highlights the risks associated with the consumption of raw milk. In this family, TB has had a very significant impact on the health of two young children. These risks are well recognised, and relevant information for farmers is available. It is of concern, therefore, that raw milk consumption remains prevalent on Irish farms. New strategies are needed, in partnership with industry, to address this important issue.

Keywords: bovine tuberculosis, Ireland, mastitis, milk, Mycobacterium bovis, pasteurisation, TB, zoonosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus