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A HACCP-based approach to mastitis control in dairy herds. Part 2: Implementation and evaluation.

Beekhuis-Gibbon L, Devitt C, Whyte P, O'Grady L, More SJ, Redmond B, Quin S, Doherty ML - Ir Vet J (2011)

Bottom Line: No overall differences in SCC before and during the implementation of the study were found when all six farms were considered together.Three of the six study farms experienced a significant decrease in herd milk recorded SCC during the implementation of the control programme.An essential part of the study was achieving initial agreement on recommendations as well as ongoing monitoring of compliance during the study.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. michael.doherty@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
Part 1 of the study described the development of a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) based programme and accompanying handbook for the control of mastitis. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of customised HACCP-based programmes, which were developed from the handbook and assessed on six Irish dairy farms. Both quantitative and qualitative (action research) research methodologies were used to measure the success of implementation and efficacy of control of sub-clinical mastitis as measured by Somatic Cell Counts (SCC) and the degree of compliance by farmers in adopting and maintaining recommendations throughout the course of the study period. No overall differences in SCC before and during the implementation of the study were found when all six farms were considered together. Three of the six study farms experienced a significant decrease in herd milk recorded SCC during the implementation of the control programme. An essential part of the study was achieving initial agreement on recommendations as well as ongoing monitoring of compliance during the study. This pilot study shows that HACCP can be implemented on farms as a means of working towards the control of mastitis and that farmer attitude, and understanding of mastitis are crucial in terms of motivation irrespective of practical approaches used to manage mastitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sociological factors taken into account during compliance with implementation of the HACCP-based control measures.
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Figure 4: Sociological factors taken into account during compliance with implementation of the HACCP-based control measures.

Mentions: Despite varying levels of compliance, all farmers when deciding whether or not to comply with the recommendations took similar factors into account. These decisions were influenced by whether or not similar control measures had been implemented on the farm previously (Figure 4), and how effective these were in addressing the mastitis problem, 'I tried dipping before but didn't really see any results, I wasn't getting penalised either so I guess I wondered what was the point'. The positive and negative impacts that such actions would have on the farm routine and the feasibility of alternatives were also important in determining compliance, 'segregating is not an option for us - it takes too long in the parlour, the best thing to do is to identify the top ten high-cell-count cows and disinfect their clusters so it isn't being transferred over to other animals, which we're starting to do now'. The availability of on-farm resources in line with the routine and the infrastructural set-up on the farm and how this would facilitate implementation of a control measure was deemed important, 'well at the moment it is not feasible to leave cows standing for 30 minutes in the yard, as I've groups coming in and out-it just wouldn't work'. Further the position of the farmer in the context of milk quality penalties was important, 'I thought it was time consuming, I didn't feel that it was necessary. Our results aren't too bad at the minute, so why add an extra load of work when you don't need to'. Drawing on previous experiences of implementing controls and the observed outcomes prior to the study, farmers also considered the possible efficacy of control measures for addressing the mastitis problem and whether or not this would justify the required financial investments and changes in routine required, 'and one of the recommendations was to dip... and then you go through a year and there's no progress'. Alternatives to control measures that farmers reported as not possible to implement were developed in partnership with the farmer. These alternative measures, e.g. segregation of 10 high SCC cows, were oriented towards reducing the mastitis problem. Though this proved beneficial, it meant that in some cases, over-emphasis was placed on control measures that were feasible to the detriment of those that farmers decided were not possible to implement, e.g. segregation of all problem animals.


A HACCP-based approach to mastitis control in dairy herds. Part 2: Implementation and evaluation.

Beekhuis-Gibbon L, Devitt C, Whyte P, O'Grady L, More SJ, Redmond B, Quin S, Doherty ML - Ir Vet J (2011)

Sociological factors taken into account during compliance with implementation of the HACCP-based control measures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3113715&req=5

Figure 4: Sociological factors taken into account during compliance with implementation of the HACCP-based control measures.
Mentions: Despite varying levels of compliance, all farmers when deciding whether or not to comply with the recommendations took similar factors into account. These decisions were influenced by whether or not similar control measures had been implemented on the farm previously (Figure 4), and how effective these were in addressing the mastitis problem, 'I tried dipping before but didn't really see any results, I wasn't getting penalised either so I guess I wondered what was the point'. The positive and negative impacts that such actions would have on the farm routine and the feasibility of alternatives were also important in determining compliance, 'segregating is not an option for us - it takes too long in the parlour, the best thing to do is to identify the top ten high-cell-count cows and disinfect their clusters so it isn't being transferred over to other animals, which we're starting to do now'. The availability of on-farm resources in line with the routine and the infrastructural set-up on the farm and how this would facilitate implementation of a control measure was deemed important, 'well at the moment it is not feasible to leave cows standing for 30 minutes in the yard, as I've groups coming in and out-it just wouldn't work'. Further the position of the farmer in the context of milk quality penalties was important, 'I thought it was time consuming, I didn't feel that it was necessary. Our results aren't too bad at the minute, so why add an extra load of work when you don't need to'. Drawing on previous experiences of implementing controls and the observed outcomes prior to the study, farmers also considered the possible efficacy of control measures for addressing the mastitis problem and whether or not this would justify the required financial investments and changes in routine required, 'and one of the recommendations was to dip... and then you go through a year and there's no progress'. Alternatives to control measures that farmers reported as not possible to implement were developed in partnership with the farmer. These alternative measures, e.g. segregation of 10 high SCC cows, were oriented towards reducing the mastitis problem. Though this proved beneficial, it meant that in some cases, over-emphasis was placed on control measures that were feasible to the detriment of those that farmers decided were not possible to implement, e.g. segregation of all problem animals.

Bottom Line: No overall differences in SCC before and during the implementation of the study were found when all six farms were considered together.Three of the six study farms experienced a significant decrease in herd milk recorded SCC during the implementation of the control programme.An essential part of the study was achieving initial agreement on recommendations as well as ongoing monitoring of compliance during the study.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. michael.doherty@ucd.ie.

ABSTRACT
Part 1 of the study described the development of a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) based programme and accompanying handbook for the control of mastitis. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of customised HACCP-based programmes, which were developed from the handbook and assessed on six Irish dairy farms. Both quantitative and qualitative (action research) research methodologies were used to measure the success of implementation and efficacy of control of sub-clinical mastitis as measured by Somatic Cell Counts (SCC) and the degree of compliance by farmers in adopting and maintaining recommendations throughout the course of the study period. No overall differences in SCC before and during the implementation of the study were found when all six farms were considered together. Three of the six study farms experienced a significant decrease in herd milk recorded SCC during the implementation of the control programme. An essential part of the study was achieving initial agreement on recommendations as well as ongoing monitoring of compliance during the study. This pilot study shows that HACCP can be implemented on farms as a means of working towards the control of mastitis and that farmer attitude, and understanding of mastitis are crucial in terms of motivation irrespective of practical approaches used to manage mastitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus