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Natural-synthetic hybrid polymers developed via electrospinning: the effect of PET in chitosan/starch system.

Espíndola-González A, Martínez-Hernández AL, Fernández-Escobar F, Castaño VM, Brostow W, Datashvili T, Velasco-Santos C - Int J Mol Sci (2011)

Bottom Line: Chitosan is an amino polysaccharide found in nature, which is biodegradable, nontoxic and biocompatible.Molecular interactions and orientation in the fibers are analyzed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies respectively, morphology by scanning electron microscopy and thermophysical properties by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry.Addition of PET to Ch + S systems results in improved thermal stability at elevated temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Engineering, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Edificio Bernardo Quintana, Cd. Universitaria, CP. 04510, Mexico D.F., Mexico; E-Mail: ameg00@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Chitosan is an amino polysaccharide found in nature, which is biodegradable, nontoxic and biocompatible. It has versatile features and can be used in a variety of applications including films, packaging, and also in medical surgery. Recently a possibility to diversify chitosan properties has emerged by combining it with synthetic materials to produce novel natural-synthetic hybrid polymers. We have studied structural and thermophysical properties of chitosan + starch + poly(ethylene terephthalate) (Ch + S + PET) fibers developed via electrospinning. Properties of these hybrids polymers are compared with extant chitosan containing hybrids synthesized by electrospinning. Molecular interactions and orientation in the fibers are analyzed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies respectively, morphology by scanning electron microscopy and thermophysical properties by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Addition of PET to Ch + S systems results in improved thermal stability at elevated temperatures.

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Morphology of chitosan microfibers.
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f4-ijms-12-01908: Morphology of chitosan microfibers.

Mentions: Surface characteristics of electrospun chitosan fibers are presented in Figure 4. These fibers were prepared with 7 wt% chitosan dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution. Relatively smooth as well as coarse regions are seen. Pores with different diameters are seen. Figures 4b and 4d show scaffold-like structures in the coarse regions. These easily visible differences could be produced by sudden changes in chitosan chain structures during the processing. An interesting explanation was given by Gholipour et al. [24]. They observed that increasing the chitosan content produces brittle fibers; also high viscosity of pure chitosan causes severe problems such that fibers cannot even be electrospun. Gholikpour and his colleagues note that an increment in the number of amino groups in acidic media causes a corresponding increase in the density of electrical charges on the surface of the jet, and therefore electrical field effects are stronger [24].


Natural-synthetic hybrid polymers developed via electrospinning: the effect of PET in chitosan/starch system.

Espíndola-González A, Martínez-Hernández AL, Fernández-Escobar F, Castaño VM, Brostow W, Datashvili T, Velasco-Santos C - Int J Mol Sci (2011)

Morphology of chitosan microfibers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111641&req=5

f4-ijms-12-01908: Morphology of chitosan microfibers.
Mentions: Surface characteristics of electrospun chitosan fibers are presented in Figure 4. These fibers were prepared with 7 wt% chitosan dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution. Relatively smooth as well as coarse regions are seen. Pores with different diameters are seen. Figures 4b and 4d show scaffold-like structures in the coarse regions. These easily visible differences could be produced by sudden changes in chitosan chain structures during the processing. An interesting explanation was given by Gholipour et al. [24]. They observed that increasing the chitosan content produces brittle fibers; also high viscosity of pure chitosan causes severe problems such that fibers cannot even be electrospun. Gholikpour and his colleagues note that an increment in the number of amino groups in acidic media causes a corresponding increase in the density of electrical charges on the surface of the jet, and therefore electrical field effects are stronger [24].

Bottom Line: Chitosan is an amino polysaccharide found in nature, which is biodegradable, nontoxic and biocompatible.Molecular interactions and orientation in the fibers are analyzed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies respectively, morphology by scanning electron microscopy and thermophysical properties by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry.Addition of PET to Ch + S systems results in improved thermal stability at elevated temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Engineering, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Edificio Bernardo Quintana, Cd. Universitaria, CP. 04510, Mexico D.F., Mexico; E-Mail: ameg00@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Chitosan is an amino polysaccharide found in nature, which is biodegradable, nontoxic and biocompatible. It has versatile features and can be used in a variety of applications including films, packaging, and also in medical surgery. Recently a possibility to diversify chitosan properties has emerged by combining it with synthetic materials to produce novel natural-synthetic hybrid polymers. We have studied structural and thermophysical properties of chitosan + starch + poly(ethylene terephthalate) (Ch + S + PET) fibers developed via electrospinning. Properties of these hybrids polymers are compared with extant chitosan containing hybrids synthesized by electrospinning. Molecular interactions and orientation in the fibers are analyzed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies respectively, morphology by scanning electron microscopy and thermophysical properties by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Addition of PET to Ch + S systems results in improved thermal stability at elevated temperatures.

Show MeSH