Limits...
Anger and the speed of full-body approach and avoidance reactions.

Mayan I, Meiran N - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: The notion that anger is linked to approach motivation received support from behavioral studies, which measured various motor responses to angering stimuli.However, none of these studies examined full-body motions which characterize many if not most everyday instances of anger.The authors incorporate a novel behavioral motor task that tests motivational direction by measuring the reaction times (RTs) of stepping forward and backward in response to the words "toward" and "away." The results show that, relative to anxiety and control conditions, anger induction resulted in a steeper approach-avoidance RT gradient which was shifted in favor of approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Beer-Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT
The notion that anger is linked to approach motivation received support from behavioral studies, which measured various motor responses to angering stimuli. However, none of these studies examined full-body motions which characterize many if not most everyday instances of anger. The authors incorporate a novel behavioral motor task that tests motivational direction by measuring the reaction times (RTs) of stepping forward and backward in response to the words "toward" and "away." The results show that, relative to anxiety and control conditions, anger induction resulted in a steeper approach-avoidance RT gradient which was shifted in favor of approach.

No MeSH data available.


Hostility mood checks as a function of mood check number and group. Error bars represent confidence intervals based on the MSE of the interaction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111546&req=5

Figure 5: Hostility mood checks as a function of mood check number and group. Error bars represent confidence intervals based on the MSE of the interaction.

Mentions: We ran a series of repeated measures two-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) according to group and mood check point on each reported mood (Figures 2–5 for the mean values). The two-way interaction was significant for anger, F(6,81) = 2.92, p < 0.01 and approached significance for anxiety, F(6,81) = 2.09, p = 0.068. Hostility was checked only in mood checks 1 and 4. For this emotion, the interaction between group and mood check approached significance, F(2,27) = 3.06, p = 0.067. The results for irritation were non-significant. We also ran a series of planned contrasts comparing the reported emotions in a given time point to the same emotion as measured in baseline (mood check 1). These contrasts, detailed in Table 1, reveal that, relative to baseline, participants in the anger group became more angry hostile and irritated, participants in the anxiety group became somewhat more anxious (the results were only close to significance), hostile and irritated and the results for the control group did change relative to baseline. Other effects were not significant.


Anger and the speed of full-body approach and avoidance reactions.

Mayan I, Meiran N - Front Psychol (2011)

Hostility mood checks as a function of mood check number and group. Error bars represent confidence intervals based on the MSE of the interaction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111546&req=5

Figure 5: Hostility mood checks as a function of mood check number and group. Error bars represent confidence intervals based on the MSE of the interaction.
Mentions: We ran a series of repeated measures two-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) according to group and mood check point on each reported mood (Figures 2–5 for the mean values). The two-way interaction was significant for anger, F(6,81) = 2.92, p < 0.01 and approached significance for anxiety, F(6,81) = 2.09, p = 0.068. Hostility was checked only in mood checks 1 and 4. For this emotion, the interaction between group and mood check approached significance, F(2,27) = 3.06, p = 0.067. The results for irritation were non-significant. We also ran a series of planned contrasts comparing the reported emotions in a given time point to the same emotion as measured in baseline (mood check 1). These contrasts, detailed in Table 1, reveal that, relative to baseline, participants in the anger group became more angry hostile and irritated, participants in the anxiety group became somewhat more anxious (the results were only close to significance), hostile and irritated and the results for the control group did change relative to baseline. Other effects were not significant.

Bottom Line: The notion that anger is linked to approach motivation received support from behavioral studies, which measured various motor responses to angering stimuli.However, none of these studies examined full-body motions which characterize many if not most everyday instances of anger.The authors incorporate a novel behavioral motor task that tests motivational direction by measuring the reaction times (RTs) of stepping forward and backward in response to the words "toward" and "away." The results show that, relative to anxiety and control conditions, anger induction resulted in a steeper approach-avoidance RT gradient which was shifted in favor of approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Beer-Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT
The notion that anger is linked to approach motivation received support from behavioral studies, which measured various motor responses to angering stimuli. However, none of these studies examined full-body motions which characterize many if not most everyday instances of anger. The authors incorporate a novel behavioral motor task that tests motivational direction by measuring the reaction times (RTs) of stepping forward and backward in response to the words "toward" and "away." The results show that, relative to anxiety and control conditions, anger induction resulted in a steeper approach-avoidance RT gradient which was shifted in favor of approach.

No MeSH data available.