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A novel stress-associated protein 'AtSAP10' from Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance to nickel, manganese, zinc, and high temperature stress.

Dixit AR, Dhankher OP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants.Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn.Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, and Plant Biology Graduate Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We describe here the functional characterization of a novel AtSAP10, a member of the Stress Associated Protein (SAP) gene family, from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. AtSAP10 contains an A20 and AN1 zinc-finger domain at the N- and C-terminal, respectively. Arabidopsis SAP10 showed differential regulation by various abiotic stresses such as heavy metals and metalloids (Ni, Cd, Mn, Zn, and As), high and low temperatures, cold, and ABA. Overexpression of AtSAP10 in Arabidopsis conferred strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn and to high temperature stress. AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants. Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn. AtSAP10 promoter-GUS fusion studies revealed a root and floral organ-specific expression of AtSAP10. Overexpression of AtSAP10-GFP fusion protein showed the localization in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

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Tissue-specific expression pattern of AtSAP10 as a transcriptional fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the promoter of AtSAP10.Two days old seedlings of AtSAP10p-GUS (A); inflorescence of AtSAP10p-GUS (B); a flower of AtSAP10p-GUS (C). Scale bar, 1 mm.
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pone-0020921-g007: Tissue-specific expression pattern of AtSAP10 as a transcriptional fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the promoter of AtSAP10.Two days old seedlings of AtSAP10p-GUS (A); inflorescence of AtSAP10p-GUS (B); a flower of AtSAP10p-GUS (C). Scale bar, 1 mm.

Mentions: To determine the tissue-specific expression of AtSAP10 gene, we created transgenic lines carrying the GUS gene fused to the 1 kb promoter region of AtSAP10. Histochemical analysis showed prominent GUS staining in roots (Figure 7A) and in floral parts such as petals, stamens, and anthers (Figure 7B & C). GUS localization in the roots showed a clear demarcation between the epicotyl and hypocotyls. No GUS staining was observed in epicotyl, stems, and leaves of AtSAP10p-GUS transgenic lines at any developmental stages. A qPCR analysis of GUS transgenic plants exposed to high temperature stress showed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the levels of β-glucuronidase transcripts compared to untreated AtSAP10p-GUS lines (Figure S4). These expression results were in agreement with the microarray data available online (https://www.genevestigator.ethz.ch/). Developmental data from the AtGenExpress project [34], for example, also showed greatest AtSAP10 transcript levels in the floral organs and roots.


A novel stress-associated protein 'AtSAP10' from Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance to nickel, manganese, zinc, and high temperature stress.

Dixit AR, Dhankher OP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Tissue-specific expression pattern of AtSAP10 as a transcriptional fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the promoter of AtSAP10.Two days old seedlings of AtSAP10p-GUS (A); inflorescence of AtSAP10p-GUS (B); a flower of AtSAP10p-GUS (C). Scale bar, 1 mm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111467&req=5

pone-0020921-g007: Tissue-specific expression pattern of AtSAP10 as a transcriptional fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the promoter of AtSAP10.Two days old seedlings of AtSAP10p-GUS (A); inflorescence of AtSAP10p-GUS (B); a flower of AtSAP10p-GUS (C). Scale bar, 1 mm.
Mentions: To determine the tissue-specific expression of AtSAP10 gene, we created transgenic lines carrying the GUS gene fused to the 1 kb promoter region of AtSAP10. Histochemical analysis showed prominent GUS staining in roots (Figure 7A) and in floral parts such as petals, stamens, and anthers (Figure 7B & C). GUS localization in the roots showed a clear demarcation between the epicotyl and hypocotyls. No GUS staining was observed in epicotyl, stems, and leaves of AtSAP10p-GUS transgenic lines at any developmental stages. A qPCR analysis of GUS transgenic plants exposed to high temperature stress showed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the levels of β-glucuronidase transcripts compared to untreated AtSAP10p-GUS lines (Figure S4). These expression results were in agreement with the microarray data available online (https://www.genevestigator.ethz.ch/). Developmental data from the AtGenExpress project [34], for example, also showed greatest AtSAP10 transcript levels in the floral organs and roots.

Bottom Line: AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants.Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn.Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, and Plant Biology Graduate Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We describe here the functional characterization of a novel AtSAP10, a member of the Stress Associated Protein (SAP) gene family, from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. AtSAP10 contains an A20 and AN1 zinc-finger domain at the N- and C-terminal, respectively. Arabidopsis SAP10 showed differential regulation by various abiotic stresses such as heavy metals and metalloids (Ni, Cd, Mn, Zn, and As), high and low temperatures, cold, and ABA. Overexpression of AtSAP10 in Arabidopsis conferred strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn and to high temperature stress. AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants. Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn. AtSAP10 promoter-GUS fusion studies revealed a root and floral organ-specific expression of AtSAP10. Overexpression of AtSAP10-GFP fusion protein showed the localization in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

Show MeSH