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A novel stress-associated protein 'AtSAP10' from Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance to nickel, manganese, zinc, and high temperature stress.

Dixit AR, Dhankher OP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants.Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn.Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, and Plant Biology Graduate Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We describe here the functional characterization of a novel AtSAP10, a member of the Stress Associated Protein (SAP) gene family, from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. AtSAP10 contains an A20 and AN1 zinc-finger domain at the N- and C-terminal, respectively. Arabidopsis SAP10 showed differential regulation by various abiotic stresses such as heavy metals and metalloids (Ni, Cd, Mn, Zn, and As), high and low temperatures, cold, and ABA. Overexpression of AtSAP10 in Arabidopsis conferred strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn and to high temperature stress. AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants. Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn. AtSAP10 promoter-GUS fusion studies revealed a root and floral organ-specific expression of AtSAP10. Overexpression of AtSAP10-GFP fusion protein showed the localization in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

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Analysis of total Ni, Mn, and Zn accumulation in Arabidopsis SAP10 overexpression lines.The total Ni concentration in shoots (A) and roots (B) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 90 µM NiCl2. Total Mn accumulation in shoots (C) and roots (D) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 1 mM MnCl2. Total Zn accumulation in shoots (E) and roots (F) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 500 µM ZnSO4. The average and standard deviation (SD) values are shown for four replicates of 25 plants each for WT and all AtSAP10 lines. Asterisk represents the significant difference in Ni, Mn, or Zn accumulation as compared to wild type (WT), (*) <0.05, (**) <0.01.
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pone-0020921-g005: Analysis of total Ni, Mn, and Zn accumulation in Arabidopsis SAP10 overexpression lines.The total Ni concentration in shoots (A) and roots (B) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 90 µM NiCl2. Total Mn accumulation in shoots (C) and roots (D) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 1 mM MnCl2. Total Zn accumulation in shoots (E) and roots (F) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 500 µM ZnSO4. The average and standard deviation (SD) values are shown for four replicates of 25 plants each for WT and all AtSAP10 lines. Asterisk represents the significant difference in Ni, Mn, or Zn accumulation as compared to wild type (WT), (*) <0.05, (**) <0.01.

Mentions: Because AtSAP10 overexpression provided strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn (as described above), we analyzed these plants for the accumulation of metals in shoot and root tissue. All four lines of the AtSAP10 transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants were grown hydroponically and elemental analysis was estimated for Ni, Mn, and Zn content in the roots and shoots. When grown on 90 µM Ni for four days, AtSAP10 overexpressing plants, had accumulated 2- to 3-fold more Ni in shoots and almost 2-fold more Ni in roots as compared to wild type plants (Figure 5A & B). When grown on 1 mM Mn, the AtSAP10 overexpressing lines had significantly greater amounts of Mn in their shoots with slightly less but still significantly greater amounts of Mn in their roots than did the wild type plants (Figure 5C & D). When analyzed for Zn, AtSAP10 plants did not show any significant uptake in either shoot or root tissue as compared to the wild type controls (Figure 5E & F).


A novel stress-associated protein 'AtSAP10' from Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance to nickel, manganese, zinc, and high temperature stress.

Dixit AR, Dhankher OP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Analysis of total Ni, Mn, and Zn accumulation in Arabidopsis SAP10 overexpression lines.The total Ni concentration in shoots (A) and roots (B) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 90 µM NiCl2. Total Mn accumulation in shoots (C) and roots (D) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 1 mM MnCl2. Total Zn accumulation in shoots (E) and roots (F) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 500 µM ZnSO4. The average and standard deviation (SD) values are shown for four replicates of 25 plants each for WT and all AtSAP10 lines. Asterisk represents the significant difference in Ni, Mn, or Zn accumulation as compared to wild type (WT), (*) <0.05, (**) <0.01.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111467&req=5

pone-0020921-g005: Analysis of total Ni, Mn, and Zn accumulation in Arabidopsis SAP10 overexpression lines.The total Ni concentration in shoots (A) and roots (B) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 90 µM NiCl2. Total Mn accumulation in shoots (C) and roots (D) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 1 mM MnCl2. Total Zn accumulation in shoots (E) and roots (F) of wild type (WT) and four overexpression transgenic lines of AtSAP10 grown on hydroponics medium containing 500 µM ZnSO4. The average and standard deviation (SD) values are shown for four replicates of 25 plants each for WT and all AtSAP10 lines. Asterisk represents the significant difference in Ni, Mn, or Zn accumulation as compared to wild type (WT), (*) <0.05, (**) <0.01.
Mentions: Because AtSAP10 overexpression provided strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn (as described above), we analyzed these plants for the accumulation of metals in shoot and root tissue. All four lines of the AtSAP10 transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants were grown hydroponically and elemental analysis was estimated for Ni, Mn, and Zn content in the roots and shoots. When grown on 90 µM Ni for four days, AtSAP10 overexpressing plants, had accumulated 2- to 3-fold more Ni in shoots and almost 2-fold more Ni in roots as compared to wild type plants (Figure 5A & B). When grown on 1 mM Mn, the AtSAP10 overexpressing lines had significantly greater amounts of Mn in their shoots with slightly less but still significantly greater amounts of Mn in their roots than did the wild type plants (Figure 5C & D). When analyzed for Zn, AtSAP10 plants did not show any significant uptake in either shoot or root tissue as compared to the wild type controls (Figure 5E & F).

Bottom Line: AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants.Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn.Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, and Plant Biology Graduate Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We describe here the functional characterization of a novel AtSAP10, a member of the Stress Associated Protein (SAP) gene family, from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. AtSAP10 contains an A20 and AN1 zinc-finger domain at the N- and C-terminal, respectively. Arabidopsis SAP10 showed differential regulation by various abiotic stresses such as heavy metals and metalloids (Ni, Cd, Mn, Zn, and As), high and low temperatures, cold, and ABA. Overexpression of AtSAP10 in Arabidopsis conferred strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn and to high temperature stress. AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants. Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn. AtSAP10 promoter-GUS fusion studies revealed a root and floral organ-specific expression of AtSAP10. Overexpression of AtSAP10-GFP fusion protein showed the localization in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

Show MeSH