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Novel arenavirus sequences in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys) setulosus from Côte d'Ivoire: implications for evolution of arenaviruses in Africa.

Coulibaly-N'Golo D, Allali B, Kouassi SK, Fichet-Calvet E, Becker-Ziaja B, Rieger T, Olschläger S, Dosso H, Denys C, Ter Meulen J, Akoua-Koffi C, Günther S - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire.Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys) setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing.Reconstruction of possible virus-host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire des Arbovirus/Entérovirus, Institut Pasteur de Côte d'Ivoire, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to identify new arenaviruses and gather insights in the evolution of arenaviruses in Africa. During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire. Specimens were screened by pan-Old World arenavirus RT-PCRs targeting S and L RNA segments as well as immunofluorescence assay. Sequences of two novel tentative species of the family Arenaviridae, Menekre and Gbagroube virus, were detected in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys) setulosus, respectively. Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys) setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing. Lassa virus was not found, although 60% of the captured animals were Mastomys natalensis. Complete S RNA and partial L RNA sequences of the novel viruses were recovered from the rodent specimens and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Gbagroube virus is a closely related sister taxon of Lassa virus, while Menekre virus clusters with the Ippy/Mobala/Mopeia virus complex. Reconstruction of possible virus-host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of Côte d'Ivoire showing the capture sites.Latitude North and longitude West coordinates are given below the name of the villages.
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pone-0020893-g001: Map of Côte d'Ivoire showing the capture sites.Latitude North and longitude West coordinates are given below the name of the villages.

Mentions: During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Arenavirus screening was performed by using two pan-OWA RT-PCRs targeting glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and large (L) gene, respectively [17]. Six out of 1,228 samples tested positive in both assays (Table 1). None of them was positive for Lassa virus. Three of the positive samples (CIV839, CIV843, and CIV1227) originated from Hylomyscus sp. captured in Menekre, Prefecture Gagnoa, and three samples (CIV608, CIV674, and CIV1290) originated from Mus (Nannomys) sp. captured in Gbagroube, Prefecture Divo. The six virus RNA-positive animals were genotyped by sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome B and 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the rodents from Menekre presumably constitute a new Hylomyscus species (details to be reported elsewhere), while the rodents from Gbagroube are Mus (Nannomys) setulosus. The virus RNA-positive Hylomyscus species had been trapped in cocoa farm and forest, and the positive Mus (Nannomys) setulosus in banana plantations and forest. Both are usually forest species living in zones with high rainfall. Additional testing of all Hylomyscus sp. (n = 3) and all Mus (Nannomys) setulosus (n = 47) that were negative in the initial screening using RT-PCRs specific for the new virus sequences did not increase the number of positive animals. Thus, virus prevalence was 100% (3/3) in Hylomyscus sp. from Menekre and 12% (3/25) in Mus (Nannomys) setulosus from Gbagroube (Table 1).


Novel arenavirus sequences in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys) setulosus from Côte d'Ivoire: implications for evolution of arenaviruses in Africa.

Coulibaly-N'Golo D, Allali B, Kouassi SK, Fichet-Calvet E, Becker-Ziaja B, Rieger T, Olschläger S, Dosso H, Denys C, Ter Meulen J, Akoua-Koffi C, Günther S - PLoS ONE (2011)

Map of Côte d'Ivoire showing the capture sites.Latitude North and longitude West coordinates are given below the name of the villages.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111462&req=5

pone-0020893-g001: Map of Côte d'Ivoire showing the capture sites.Latitude North and longitude West coordinates are given below the name of the villages.
Mentions: During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Arenavirus screening was performed by using two pan-OWA RT-PCRs targeting glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and large (L) gene, respectively [17]. Six out of 1,228 samples tested positive in both assays (Table 1). None of them was positive for Lassa virus. Three of the positive samples (CIV839, CIV843, and CIV1227) originated from Hylomyscus sp. captured in Menekre, Prefecture Gagnoa, and three samples (CIV608, CIV674, and CIV1290) originated from Mus (Nannomys) sp. captured in Gbagroube, Prefecture Divo. The six virus RNA-positive animals were genotyped by sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome B and 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the rodents from Menekre presumably constitute a new Hylomyscus species (details to be reported elsewhere), while the rodents from Gbagroube are Mus (Nannomys) setulosus. The virus RNA-positive Hylomyscus species had been trapped in cocoa farm and forest, and the positive Mus (Nannomys) setulosus in banana plantations and forest. Both are usually forest species living in zones with high rainfall. Additional testing of all Hylomyscus sp. (n = 3) and all Mus (Nannomys) setulosus (n = 47) that were negative in the initial screening using RT-PCRs specific for the new virus sequences did not increase the number of positive animals. Thus, virus prevalence was 100% (3/3) in Hylomyscus sp. from Menekre and 12% (3/25) in Mus (Nannomys) setulosus from Gbagroube (Table 1).

Bottom Line: During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire.Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys) setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing.Reconstruction of possible virus-host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire des Arbovirus/Entérovirus, Institut Pasteur de Côte d'Ivoire, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to identify new arenaviruses and gather insights in the evolution of arenaviruses in Africa. During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire. Specimens were screened by pan-Old World arenavirus RT-PCRs targeting S and L RNA segments as well as immunofluorescence assay. Sequences of two novel tentative species of the family Arenaviridae, Menekre and Gbagroube virus, were detected in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys) setulosus, respectively. Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys) setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing. Lassa virus was not found, although 60% of the captured animals were Mastomys natalensis. Complete S RNA and partial L RNA sequences of the novel viruses were recovered from the rodent specimens and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Gbagroube virus is a closely related sister taxon of Lassa virus, while Menekre virus clusters with the Ippy/Mobala/Mopeia virus complex. Reconstruction of possible virus-host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus