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Modality Switching in a Property Verification Task: An ERP Study of What Happens When Candles Flicker after High Heels Click.

Collins J, Pecher D, Zeelenberg R, Coulson S - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex.Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems.Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Cognition Lab, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California San Diego San Diego, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
The perceptual modalities associated with property words, such as flicker or click, have previously been demonstrated to affect subsequent property verification judgments (Pecher et al., 2003). Known as the conceptual modality switch effect, this finding supports the claim that brain systems for perception and action help subserve the representation of concepts. The present study addressed the cognitive and neural substrate of this effect by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants performed a property verification task with visual or auditory properties in key trials. We found that for visual property verifications, modality switching was associated with an increased amplitude N400. For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex. Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems. Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Current source density (CSD) maps of responses to visual and auditory properties including both switch and no-switch conditions. The units are normalized values of micro amps per square meter. CSD maps highlight local differences between electrode sites likely to reflect nearby neural generators. These maps suggest a subtle difference in the configuration of neural generators and timing of activation for the visual versus auditory property stimuli during the 500–800 ms interval, particularly at 600 ms.
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Figure 7: Current source density (CSD) maps of responses to visual and auditory properties including both switch and no-switch conditions. The units are normalized values of micro amps per square meter. CSD maps highlight local differences between electrode sites likely to reflect nearby neural generators. These maps suggest a subtle difference in the configuration of neural generators and timing of activation for the visual versus auditory property stimuli during the 500–800 ms interval, particularly at 600 ms.

Mentions: We also followed up on the marginal interaction between modality and electrode site as the possible topographic differences were of interest to our question of access to underlying perceptual modalities by property words. We tested midline, medial, and lateral sites separately. Our midline test included factors of modality (visual, auditory) and anteriority (seven midline electrodes, see Figure 2). This test revealed a marginal interaction between modality and anteriority [F(6,114) = 2.67, p = 0.057, ε = 0.45 MSE = 1.35]. Our test of the medial sites was similar and also included a factor of hemisphere (right, left). This test also revealed a difference between modalities that interacted with anteriority [F(6,114) = 3.55, p < 0.05, ε = 0.41 MSE = 3.70], but no hemispheric differences were significant (Fs < 1.8). No differences at the lateral sites were observed (Fs < 2). The interaction effects between modality and scalp location can be seen in Figure 7 with the current source density (CSD) plots. These figures show that the visual and auditory properties result in different patterns of voltage change during this time interval.


Modality Switching in a Property Verification Task: An ERP Study of What Happens When Candles Flicker after High Heels Click.

Collins J, Pecher D, Zeelenberg R, Coulson S - Front Psychol (2011)

Current source density (CSD) maps of responses to visual and auditory properties including both switch and no-switch conditions. The units are normalized values of micro amps per square meter. CSD maps highlight local differences between electrode sites likely to reflect nearby neural generators. These maps suggest a subtle difference in the configuration of neural generators and timing of activation for the visual versus auditory property stimuli during the 500–800 ms interval, particularly at 600 ms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111443&req=5

Figure 7: Current source density (CSD) maps of responses to visual and auditory properties including both switch and no-switch conditions. The units are normalized values of micro amps per square meter. CSD maps highlight local differences between electrode sites likely to reflect nearby neural generators. These maps suggest a subtle difference in the configuration of neural generators and timing of activation for the visual versus auditory property stimuli during the 500–800 ms interval, particularly at 600 ms.
Mentions: We also followed up on the marginal interaction between modality and electrode site as the possible topographic differences were of interest to our question of access to underlying perceptual modalities by property words. We tested midline, medial, and lateral sites separately. Our midline test included factors of modality (visual, auditory) and anteriority (seven midline electrodes, see Figure 2). This test revealed a marginal interaction between modality and anteriority [F(6,114) = 2.67, p = 0.057, ε = 0.45 MSE = 1.35]. Our test of the medial sites was similar and also included a factor of hemisphere (right, left). This test also revealed a difference between modalities that interacted with anteriority [F(6,114) = 3.55, p < 0.05, ε = 0.41 MSE = 3.70], but no hemispheric differences were significant (Fs < 1.8). No differences at the lateral sites were observed (Fs < 2). The interaction effects between modality and scalp location can be seen in Figure 7 with the current source density (CSD) plots. These figures show that the visual and auditory properties result in different patterns of voltage change during this time interval.

Bottom Line: For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex.Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems.Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Cognition Lab, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California San Diego San Diego, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
The perceptual modalities associated with property words, such as flicker or click, have previously been demonstrated to affect subsequent property verification judgments (Pecher et al., 2003). Known as the conceptual modality switch effect, this finding supports the claim that brain systems for perception and action help subserve the representation of concepts. The present study addressed the cognitive and neural substrate of this effect by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants performed a property verification task with visual or auditory properties in key trials. We found that for visual property verifications, modality switching was associated with an increased amplitude N400. For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex. Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems. Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus