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Modality Switching in a Property Verification Task: An ERP Study of What Happens When Candles Flicker after High Heels Click.

Collins J, Pecher D, Zeelenberg R, Coulson S - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex.Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems.Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Cognition Lab, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California San Diego San Diego, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
The perceptual modalities associated with property words, such as flicker or click, have previously been demonstrated to affect subsequent property verification judgments (Pecher et al., 2003). Known as the conceptual modality switch effect, this finding supports the claim that brain systems for perception and action help subserve the representation of concepts. The present study addressed the cognitive and neural substrate of this effect by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants performed a property verification task with visual or auditory properties in key trials. We found that for visual property verifications, modality switching was associated with an increased amplitude N400. For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex. Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems. Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The N400 elicited by visual property verification targets in the switch (red) and no-switch (black) conditions. Each graph represents data recorded from a midline electrode over frontal (top), central (middle), and parietal (bottom) regions of the scalp. Time is plotted on the x-axis against voltage on the y-axis. By convention, negative polarity is plotted upward.
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Figure 3: The N400 elicited by visual property verification targets in the switch (red) and no-switch (black) conditions. Each graph represents data recorded from a midline electrode over frontal (top), central (middle), and parietal (bottom) regions of the scalp. Time is plotted on the x-axis against voltage on the y-axis. By convention, negative polarity is plotted upward.

Mentions: Overall analysis of ERPs measured 200–500 ms after stimulus onset revealed a significant interaction between the switch and the modality factors [F(1,19) = 4.61, p < 0.05, MSE = 147.25]. Follow-up analyses of each individual modality revealed no effects in the auditory modality (Fs < 1; auditory switch = 5.08 μV, auditory no-switch = 4.76 μV), but a reliable switch effect in the visual one [F(1,19) = 4.93, p < 0.05, MSE = 135.52]. The latter reflects the slightly more negative (0.7 μV) ERPs elicited in the visual switch (4.53 μV) than the visual no-switch (5.21 μV) condition (Figure 3). Although this difference showed up as a main effect in the analysis, visual inspection suggests it was largest over centro-parietal sites characteristic of the classic N400 effect (Figure 4).


Modality Switching in a Property Verification Task: An ERP Study of What Happens When Candles Flicker after High Heels Click.

Collins J, Pecher D, Zeelenberg R, Coulson S - Front Psychol (2011)

The N400 elicited by visual property verification targets in the switch (red) and no-switch (black) conditions. Each graph represents data recorded from a midline electrode over frontal (top), central (middle), and parietal (bottom) regions of the scalp. Time is plotted on the x-axis against voltage on the y-axis. By convention, negative polarity is plotted upward.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111443&req=5

Figure 3: The N400 elicited by visual property verification targets in the switch (red) and no-switch (black) conditions. Each graph represents data recorded from a midline electrode over frontal (top), central (middle), and parietal (bottom) regions of the scalp. Time is plotted on the x-axis against voltage on the y-axis. By convention, negative polarity is plotted upward.
Mentions: Overall analysis of ERPs measured 200–500 ms after stimulus onset revealed a significant interaction between the switch and the modality factors [F(1,19) = 4.61, p < 0.05, MSE = 147.25]. Follow-up analyses of each individual modality revealed no effects in the auditory modality (Fs < 1; auditory switch = 5.08 μV, auditory no-switch = 4.76 μV), but a reliable switch effect in the visual one [F(1,19) = 4.93, p < 0.05, MSE = 135.52]. The latter reflects the slightly more negative (0.7 μV) ERPs elicited in the visual switch (4.53 μV) than the visual no-switch (5.21 μV) condition (Figure 3). Although this difference showed up as a main effect in the analysis, visual inspection suggests it was largest over centro-parietal sites characteristic of the classic N400 effect (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex.Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems.Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Cognition Lab, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California San Diego San Diego, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
The perceptual modalities associated with property words, such as flicker or click, have previously been demonstrated to affect subsequent property verification judgments (Pecher et al., 2003). Known as the conceptual modality switch effect, this finding supports the claim that brain systems for perception and action help subserve the representation of concepts. The present study addressed the cognitive and neural substrate of this effect by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants performed a property verification task with visual or auditory properties in key trials. We found that for visual property verifications, modality switching was associated with an increased amplitude N400. For auditory verifications, switching led to a larger late positive complex. Observed ERP effects of modality switching suggest property words access perceptual brain systems. Moreover, the timing and pattern of the effects suggest perceptual systems impact the decision-making stage in the verification of auditory properties, and the semantic stage in the verification of visual properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus