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The changes in China's forests: an analysis using the Forest Identity.

Shi L, Zhao S, Tang Z, Fang J - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The results showed that forest area and growing stock density increased by 0.51% and 0.44% annually over the past three decades, while the conversion ratio of forest biomass to growing stock declined by 0.10% annually.These developments resulted in a net annual increase of 0.85% in forest carbon sequestration, which is equivalent to a net biomass carbon uptake of 43.8 Tg per year (1 Tg = 10(12) g).This increase can be attributed to the national reforestation/afforestation programs, environmentally enhanced forest growth and economic development as indicated by the average gross domestic product.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes of the Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Changes in forest carbon stocks are a determinant of the regional carbon budget. In the past several decades, China has experienced a pronounced increase in forest area and density. However, few comprehensive analyses have been conducted. In this study, we employed the Forest Identity concept to evaluate the changing status of China's forests over the past three decades, using national forest inventory data of five periods (1977-1981, 1984-1988, 1989-1993, 1994-1998, and 1999-2003). The results showed that forest area and growing stock density increased by 0.51% and 0.44% annually over the past three decades, while the conversion ratio of forest biomass to growing stock declined by 0.10% annually. These developments resulted in a net annual increase of 0.85% in forest carbon sequestration, which is equivalent to a net biomass carbon uptake of 43.8 Tg per year (1 Tg = 10(12) g). This increase can be attributed to the national reforestation/afforestation programs, environmentally enhanced forest growth and economic development as indicated by the average gross domestic product.

Show MeSH
The relative annual rate of change of forest growing stock (a + d) in provinces plotted as a function of their average GDP (y = 0.003x−0.658).The change in forest growing stock was measured over the period 1977–2003. The GDP values (U.S. dollars) were for 1999.
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pone-0020778-g006: The relative annual rate of change of forest growing stock (a + d) in provinces plotted as a function of their average GDP (y = 0.003x−0.658).The change in forest growing stock was measured over the period 1977–2003. The GDP values (U.S. dollars) were for 1999.

Mentions: It is generally recognized that environmental degradation (including deforestation) and economic development (human activities) are closely related, a pattern described by an Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) [42]–[45]. The EKC implies that in poor areas (with a low average income), economic development leads to ecological deterioration, whereas in rich areas (with a relatively high average income), the awareness of environmental protection increases. In the rich areas, economic development does not inflict environmental damage; instead, it promotes the sound development of environment. However, our research shows that the relative annual rate of change of growing stock and the average GDP (GDP per capita) in 1999 showed a significant positive relationship (R2 = 0.56, P<0.01) (Fig. 6), which does not support the EKC.


The changes in China's forests: an analysis using the Forest Identity.

Shi L, Zhao S, Tang Z, Fang J - PLoS ONE (2011)

The relative annual rate of change of forest growing stock (a + d) in provinces plotted as a function of their average GDP (y = 0.003x−0.658).The change in forest growing stock was measured over the period 1977–2003. The GDP values (U.S. dollars) were for 1999.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111435&req=5

pone-0020778-g006: The relative annual rate of change of forest growing stock (a + d) in provinces plotted as a function of their average GDP (y = 0.003x−0.658).The change in forest growing stock was measured over the period 1977–2003. The GDP values (U.S. dollars) were for 1999.
Mentions: It is generally recognized that environmental degradation (including deforestation) and economic development (human activities) are closely related, a pattern described by an Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) [42]–[45]. The EKC implies that in poor areas (with a low average income), economic development leads to ecological deterioration, whereas in rich areas (with a relatively high average income), the awareness of environmental protection increases. In the rich areas, economic development does not inflict environmental damage; instead, it promotes the sound development of environment. However, our research shows that the relative annual rate of change of growing stock and the average GDP (GDP per capita) in 1999 showed a significant positive relationship (R2 = 0.56, P<0.01) (Fig. 6), which does not support the EKC.

Bottom Line: The results showed that forest area and growing stock density increased by 0.51% and 0.44% annually over the past three decades, while the conversion ratio of forest biomass to growing stock declined by 0.10% annually.These developments resulted in a net annual increase of 0.85% in forest carbon sequestration, which is equivalent to a net biomass carbon uptake of 43.8 Tg per year (1 Tg = 10(12) g).This increase can be attributed to the national reforestation/afforestation programs, environmentally enhanced forest growth and economic development as indicated by the average gross domestic product.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes of the Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Changes in forest carbon stocks are a determinant of the regional carbon budget. In the past several decades, China has experienced a pronounced increase in forest area and density. However, few comprehensive analyses have been conducted. In this study, we employed the Forest Identity concept to evaluate the changing status of China's forests over the past three decades, using national forest inventory data of five periods (1977-1981, 1984-1988, 1989-1993, 1994-1998, and 1999-2003). The results showed that forest area and growing stock density increased by 0.51% and 0.44% annually over the past three decades, while the conversion ratio of forest biomass to growing stock declined by 0.10% annually. These developments resulted in a net annual increase of 0.85% in forest carbon sequestration, which is equivalent to a net biomass carbon uptake of 43.8 Tg per year (1 Tg = 10(12) g). This increase can be attributed to the national reforestation/afforestation programs, environmentally enhanced forest growth and economic development as indicated by the average gross domestic product.

Show MeSH