Limits...
Clinical symptoms and performance on the Continuous Performance Test in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder between subtypes: a natural follow-up study for 6 months.

Wang LJ, Huang YS, Chiang YL, Hsiao CC, Shang ZY, Chen CK - BMC Psychiatry (2011)

Bottom Line: There were significant improvements in clinical symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention, and impulsivity performance in CPT during the 6-month treatment.Non-aggressive patients had significantly greater changes in distraction and impulsivity performances in CPT from baseline to month 6 than aggressive patients.We found that ADHD symptoms, which included impulsive performances in CPT and clinical inattention and hyperactivity dimensions, had improved significantly over 6 months under pragmatic treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aims of this study were to determine the time course of improvements in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinical symptoms and neurocognitive function in a realistic clinical setting, and the differences in ADHD symptom improvement using different classifications of ADHD subtypes.

Methods: The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was completed by parents of ADHD children at the initial visit. The computerized Continuous Performance Test (CPT), Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham, and Version IV Scale for ADHD (SNAP-IV), and ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) were performed at baseline, one month, three months, and six months later, respectively. Patient care including drug therapy was performed at the discretion of the psychiatrist. The ADHD patients were divided into DSM-IV subtypes (Inattentive, Hyperactive-impulsive and Combined type), and were additionally categorized into aggressive and non-aggressive subtypes by aggression scale in CBCL for comparisons.

Results: There were 50 ADHD patients with a mean age of 7.84 ± 1.64 years; 15 of them were inattentive type, 11 were hyperactive-impulsive type, and 24 were combined type. In addition, 28 of the ADHD patients were grouped into aggressive and 22 into non-aggressive subtypes. There were significant improvements in clinical symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention, and impulsivity performance in CPT during the 6-month treatment. The clinical hyperactive symptoms were significantly different between ADHD patients sub-grouping both by DSM-IV and aggression. Non-aggressive patients had significantly greater changes in distraction and impulsivity performances in CPT from baseline to month 6 than aggressive patients.

Conclusions: We found that ADHD symptoms, which included impulsive performances in CPT and clinical inattention and hyperactivity dimensions, had improved significantly over 6 months under pragmatic treatments. The non-aggressive ADHD patients might have a higher potential for improving in CPT performance than aggressive ones. However, it warrant further investigation whether the different classifications of ADHD patients could be valid for predicting the improvements in ADHD patients' clinical symptoms and neurocognitive performance.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in ADHD symptom composite scores between DSM-IV subtypes of ADHD patients during 6 months of real-world clinical treatment. There were no significant differences between DSM-IV subtypes in CPT distraction (a), CPT impulsivity (b), and clinical inattention (d).  For clinical hyperactivity (c), there was significant difference (F = 4.11, p = 0.024) between subtypes (H>I, C>I, H˜C). There were no significant interactions between DSM-IV subtypes and visits in these four composite scores.  I = inattentive type; H = hyperactive-impulsive type; C = combined type
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111344&req=5

Figure 1: Changes in ADHD symptom composite scores between DSM-IV subtypes of ADHD patients during 6 months of real-world clinical treatment. There were no significant differences between DSM-IV subtypes in CPT distraction (a), CPT impulsivity (b), and clinical inattention (d). For clinical hyperactivity (c), there was significant difference (F = 4.11, p = 0.024) between subtypes (H>I, C>I, H˜C). There were no significant interactions between DSM-IV subtypes and visits in these four composite scores. I = inattentive type; H = hyperactive-impulsive type; C = combined type

Mentions: In terms of the differences between DSM-IV subtypes, Figure 1 summarizes the results of changes over time for each of the four dependent factors. For CPT distraction, CPT impulsivity, and clinical inattention, there was no significant difference between the subtypes and no significant interaction between subtypes and visits in these factors. For clinical hyperactivity, there was significant difference (F = 4.11, p = 0.024) between subtypes, but no significant interactions between DSM-IV subtypes and visits.


Clinical symptoms and performance on the Continuous Performance Test in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder between subtypes: a natural follow-up study for 6 months.

Wang LJ, Huang YS, Chiang YL, Hsiao CC, Shang ZY, Chen CK - BMC Psychiatry (2011)

Changes in ADHD symptom composite scores between DSM-IV subtypes of ADHD patients during 6 months of real-world clinical treatment. There were no significant differences between DSM-IV subtypes in CPT distraction (a), CPT impulsivity (b), and clinical inattention (d).  For clinical hyperactivity (c), there was significant difference (F = 4.11, p = 0.024) between subtypes (H>I, C>I, H˜C). There were no significant interactions between DSM-IV subtypes and visits in these four composite scores.  I = inattentive type; H = hyperactive-impulsive type; C = combined type
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111344&req=5

Figure 1: Changes in ADHD symptom composite scores between DSM-IV subtypes of ADHD patients during 6 months of real-world clinical treatment. There were no significant differences between DSM-IV subtypes in CPT distraction (a), CPT impulsivity (b), and clinical inattention (d). For clinical hyperactivity (c), there was significant difference (F = 4.11, p = 0.024) between subtypes (H>I, C>I, H˜C). There were no significant interactions between DSM-IV subtypes and visits in these four composite scores. I = inattentive type; H = hyperactive-impulsive type; C = combined type
Mentions: In terms of the differences between DSM-IV subtypes, Figure 1 summarizes the results of changes over time for each of the four dependent factors. For CPT distraction, CPT impulsivity, and clinical inattention, there was no significant difference between the subtypes and no significant interaction between subtypes and visits in these factors. For clinical hyperactivity, there was significant difference (F = 4.11, p = 0.024) between subtypes, but no significant interactions between DSM-IV subtypes and visits.

Bottom Line: There were significant improvements in clinical symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention, and impulsivity performance in CPT during the 6-month treatment.Non-aggressive patients had significantly greater changes in distraction and impulsivity performances in CPT from baseline to month 6 than aggressive patients.We found that ADHD symptoms, which included impulsive performances in CPT and clinical inattention and hyperactivity dimensions, had improved significantly over 6 months under pragmatic treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aims of this study were to determine the time course of improvements in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinical symptoms and neurocognitive function in a realistic clinical setting, and the differences in ADHD symptom improvement using different classifications of ADHD subtypes.

Methods: The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was completed by parents of ADHD children at the initial visit. The computerized Continuous Performance Test (CPT), Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham, and Version IV Scale for ADHD (SNAP-IV), and ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) were performed at baseline, one month, three months, and six months later, respectively. Patient care including drug therapy was performed at the discretion of the psychiatrist. The ADHD patients were divided into DSM-IV subtypes (Inattentive, Hyperactive-impulsive and Combined type), and were additionally categorized into aggressive and non-aggressive subtypes by aggression scale in CBCL for comparisons.

Results: There were 50 ADHD patients with a mean age of 7.84 ± 1.64 years; 15 of them were inattentive type, 11 were hyperactive-impulsive type, and 24 were combined type. In addition, 28 of the ADHD patients were grouped into aggressive and 22 into non-aggressive subtypes. There were significant improvements in clinical symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention, and impulsivity performance in CPT during the 6-month treatment. The clinical hyperactive symptoms were significantly different between ADHD patients sub-grouping both by DSM-IV and aggression. Non-aggressive patients had significantly greater changes in distraction and impulsivity performances in CPT from baseline to month 6 than aggressive patients.

Conclusions: We found that ADHD symptoms, which included impulsive performances in CPT and clinical inattention and hyperactivity dimensions, had improved significantly over 6 months under pragmatic treatments. The non-aggressive ADHD patients might have a higher potential for improving in CPT performance than aggressive ones. However, it warrant further investigation whether the different classifications of ADHD patients could be valid for predicting the improvements in ADHD patients' clinical symptoms and neurocognitive performance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus