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Gender affects body language reading.

Sokolov AA, Krüger S, Enck P, Krägeloh-Mann I, Pavlova MA - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: However, gender effects in body language reading are largely unknown.This effect, however, is modulated by emotional content of actions: males surpass in recognition accuracy of happy actions, whereas females tend to excel in recognition of hostile angry knocking.Advantage of women in recognition accuracy of neutral actions suggests that females are better tuned to the lack of emotional content in body actions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Neurology and Child Development, Children's Hospital, Medical School, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Body motion is a rich source of information for social cognition. However, gender effects in body language reading are largely unknown. Here we investigated whether, and, if so, how recognition of emotional expressions revealed by body motion is gender dependent. To this end, females and males were presented with point-light displays portraying knocking at a door performed with different emotional expressions. The findings show that gender affects accuracy rather than speed of body language reading. This effect, however, is modulated by emotional content of actions: males surpass in recognition accuracy of happy actions, whereas females tend to excel in recognition of hostile angry knocking. Advantage of women in recognition accuracy of neutral actions suggests that females are better tuned to the lack of emotional content in body actions. The study provides novel insights into understanding of gender effects in body language reading, and helps to shed light on gender vulnerability to neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental impairments in visual social cognition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Three static frames taken from the dynamic sequence representing knocking motion by a set of dots placed on the arm joints, shoulder, and head of an otherwise invisible actor. Actors were seen facing right, in a sagittal view, and struck the surface directly in front of them.
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Figure 1: Three static frames taken from the dynamic sequence representing knocking motion by a set of dots placed on the arm joints, shoulder, and head of an otherwise invisible actor. Actors were seen facing right, in a sagittal view, and struck the surface directly in front of them.

Mentions: The present work intends to make an initial step in filling the gap, and to clarify whether, and, if so, how perceiver's gender affects recognition of emotional expressions conveyed by actions of others. More specifically, we ask (i) whether gender affects recognition of emotions represented by body motion, or, in other words, whether females excel in recognition of emotional actions; and (ii) whether gender effects depend on emotional content of actions. To this end, healthy young females and males were presented with point-light displays portraying knocking at a door with different emotional expressions (happy, neutral, and angry). We took advantage of a point-light technique that helps to isolate information revealed by motion from other cues (shape, color, etc.). Perceivers saw only a few bright dots placed on the main joints of an otherwise invisible arm (Figure 1) so that all other clues except for motion characteristics were abandoned.


Gender affects body language reading.

Sokolov AA, Krüger S, Enck P, Krägeloh-Mann I, Pavlova MA - Front Psychol (2011)

Three static frames taken from the dynamic sequence representing knocking motion by a set of dots placed on the arm joints, shoulder, and head of an otherwise invisible actor. Actors were seen facing right, in a sagittal view, and struck the surface directly in front of them.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111255&req=5

Figure 1: Three static frames taken from the dynamic sequence representing knocking motion by a set of dots placed on the arm joints, shoulder, and head of an otherwise invisible actor. Actors were seen facing right, in a sagittal view, and struck the surface directly in front of them.
Mentions: The present work intends to make an initial step in filling the gap, and to clarify whether, and, if so, how perceiver's gender affects recognition of emotional expressions conveyed by actions of others. More specifically, we ask (i) whether gender affects recognition of emotions represented by body motion, or, in other words, whether females excel in recognition of emotional actions; and (ii) whether gender effects depend on emotional content of actions. To this end, healthy young females and males were presented with point-light displays portraying knocking at a door with different emotional expressions (happy, neutral, and angry). We took advantage of a point-light technique that helps to isolate information revealed by motion from other cues (shape, color, etc.). Perceivers saw only a few bright dots placed on the main joints of an otherwise invisible arm (Figure 1) so that all other clues except for motion characteristics were abandoned.

Bottom Line: However, gender effects in body language reading are largely unknown.This effect, however, is modulated by emotional content of actions: males surpass in recognition accuracy of happy actions, whereas females tend to excel in recognition of hostile angry knocking.Advantage of women in recognition accuracy of neutral actions suggests that females are better tuned to the lack of emotional content in body actions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Neurology and Child Development, Children's Hospital, Medical School, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Body motion is a rich source of information for social cognition. However, gender effects in body language reading are largely unknown. Here we investigated whether, and, if so, how recognition of emotional expressions revealed by body motion is gender dependent. To this end, females and males were presented with point-light displays portraying knocking at a door performed with different emotional expressions. The findings show that gender affects accuracy rather than speed of body language reading. This effect, however, is modulated by emotional content of actions: males surpass in recognition accuracy of happy actions, whereas females tend to excel in recognition of hostile angry knocking. Advantage of women in recognition accuracy of neutral actions suggests that females are better tuned to the lack of emotional content in body actions. The study provides novel insights into understanding of gender effects in body language reading, and helps to shed light on gender vulnerability to neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental impairments in visual social cognition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus