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Attributional and relational processing in pigeons.

Garlick D, Gant DJ, Brakel LA, Blaisdell AP - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: A strong preference was found for the attribute of color.The discrimination was not found to transfer to novel colors, however, suggesting that a general color rule had not been learned.Further, when color could not be used to guide responding, some influence of other attributional cues such as shape, but not relational cues, was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Six pigeons were trained using a matching-to-sample procedure where sample and rewarded comparisons matched on both attributional (color) and relational (horizontal or vertical orientation) dimensions. Probes then evaluated the pigeons' preference to comparisons that varied in these dimensions. A strong preference was found for the attribute of color. The discrimination was not found to transfer to novel colors, however, suggesting that a general color rule had not been learned. Further, when color could not be used to guide responding, some influence of other attributional cues such as shape, but not relational cues, was found. We conclude that pigeons based their performance on attributional properties of but not on relational properties between elements in our matching-to-sample procedure. Future studies should look at examining other attributes to compare attributional versus relational processing.

No MeSH data available.


Acquisition curves showing mean discrimination accuracy during training as a function of 12-session block. Each line depicts an individual bird.
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Figure 3: Acquisition curves showing mean discrimination accuracy during training as a function of 12-session block. Each line depicts an individual bird.

Mentions: Figure 3 illustrates acquisition across training. Two of the pigeons, George and Jerry, showed poor responding initially, slowing their acquisition. However, all birds eventually reached the performance criterion of 80% correct on two consecutive sessions by the end of acquisition. Figure 4 illustrates performance on the probes. Pigeons showed a strong preference for the comparison that matched the sample in terms of attribute rather than relation. This conclusion was supported by a dependent-sample t-test comparing proportion of choices to the attribute match comparison to a chance level of performance = 0.5, t(5) = 20.15, p < 0.001.


Attributional and relational processing in pigeons.

Garlick D, Gant DJ, Brakel LA, Blaisdell AP - Front Psychol (2011)

Acquisition curves showing mean discrimination accuracy during training as a function of 12-session block. Each line depicts an individual bird.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111252&req=5

Figure 3: Acquisition curves showing mean discrimination accuracy during training as a function of 12-session block. Each line depicts an individual bird.
Mentions: Figure 3 illustrates acquisition across training. Two of the pigeons, George and Jerry, showed poor responding initially, slowing their acquisition. However, all birds eventually reached the performance criterion of 80% correct on two consecutive sessions by the end of acquisition. Figure 4 illustrates performance on the probes. Pigeons showed a strong preference for the comparison that matched the sample in terms of attribute rather than relation. This conclusion was supported by a dependent-sample t-test comparing proportion of choices to the attribute match comparison to a chance level of performance = 0.5, t(5) = 20.15, p < 0.001.

Bottom Line: A strong preference was found for the attribute of color.The discrimination was not found to transfer to novel colors, however, suggesting that a general color rule had not been learned.Further, when color could not be used to guide responding, some influence of other attributional cues such as shape, but not relational cues, was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Six pigeons were trained using a matching-to-sample procedure where sample and rewarded comparisons matched on both attributional (color) and relational (horizontal or vertical orientation) dimensions. Probes then evaluated the pigeons' preference to comparisons that varied in these dimensions. A strong preference was found for the attribute of color. The discrimination was not found to transfer to novel colors, however, suggesting that a general color rule had not been learned. Further, when color could not be used to guide responding, some influence of other attributional cues such as shape, but not relational cues, was found. We conclude that pigeons based their performance on attributional properties of but not on relational properties between elements in our matching-to-sample procedure. Future studies should look at examining other attributes to compare attributional versus relational processing.

No MeSH data available.