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A multimarker QPCR-based platform for the detection of circulating tumour cells in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Molloy TJ, Devriese LA, Helgason HH, Bosma AJ, Hauptmann M, Voest EE, Schellens JH, van't Veer LJ - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Bottom Line: The CTC detection was performed using ErbB2/EpCAM immunomagnetic tumour cell enrichment followed by multimarker quantitative PCR (QPCR).The specificity was 100%.The median follow-up time was 51 months (range: 17-60).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Experimental Therapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: The detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) has been linked with poor prognosis in advanced breast cancer. Relatively few studies have been undertaken to study the clinical relevance of CTCs in early-stage breast cancer.

Methods: In a prospective study, we evaluated CTCs in the peripheral blood of 82 early-stage breast cancer patients. Control groups consisted of 16 advanced breast cancer patients and 45 healthy volunteers. The CTC detection was performed using ErbB2/EpCAM immunomagnetic tumour cell enrichment followed by multimarker quantitative PCR (QPCR). The CTC status and common clinicopathological factors were correlated to relapse-free, breast cancer-related and overall survival.

Results: Circulating tumour cells were detected in 16 of 82 (20%) patients with early-stage breast cancer and in 13 out of 16 (81%) with advanced breast cancer. The specificity was 100%. The median follow-up time was 51 months (range: 17-60). The CTC positivity in early-stage breast cancer patients resulted in significantly poorer relapse-free survival (log rank test: P=0.003) and was an independent predictor of relapse-free survival (multivariate hazard ratio=5.13, P=0.006, 95% CI: 1.62-16.31).

Conclusion: The detection of CTCs in peripheral blood of early-stage breast cancer patients provided prognostic information for relapse-free survival.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan–Meier survival curve for relapse-free survival of early-stage breast cancer patients (n=82) who were CTC negative (n=66) or positive (n=16) at diagnosis. CTC-positive patients had a significantly poorer relapse-free survival than CTC-negative patients (univariate hazard ratio=4.72; 95% CI: 1.52–14.66; log rank test P=0.003). The number of patients at risk at each time point (months) are indicated for the CTC-negative (black) and CTC-positive (grey) groups. Abbreviations: CTC-positive or CTC-negative=positive or negative circulating tumour cell status according to quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) score; FU=follow-up.
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fig2: Kaplan–Meier survival curve for relapse-free survival of early-stage breast cancer patients (n=82) who were CTC negative (n=66) or positive (n=16) at diagnosis. CTC-positive patients had a significantly poorer relapse-free survival than CTC-negative patients (univariate hazard ratio=4.72; 95% CI: 1.52–14.66; log rank test P=0.003). The number of patients at risk at each time point (months) are indicated for the CTC-negative (black) and CTC-positive (grey) groups. Abbreviations: CTC-positive or CTC-negative=positive or negative circulating tumour cell status according to quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) score; FU=follow-up.

Mentions: Despite the relatively short follow-up period of this prospective study, CTC status at the time of diagnosis as determined by our assay was a significant predictor of relapse-free survival, with a hazard ratio of 4.72 (95% CI: 1.52–14.66, P=0.003; Figure 2 and Table 4). Importantly, multivariate analysis demonstrated that CTC status at the time of diagnosis was a significant and independent predictor of relapse-free survival (multivariate Cox regression, multivariate hazard ratio=5.13, P=0.006, 95% CI: 1.62–16.31; Table 5). The 4-year relapse-free survival rates were 92 and 69% for CTC-negative and CTC-positive patients, respectively (Figure 2).


A multimarker QPCR-based platform for the detection of circulating tumour cells in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Molloy TJ, Devriese LA, Helgason HH, Bosma AJ, Hauptmann M, Voest EE, Schellens JH, van't Veer LJ - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Kaplan–Meier survival curve for relapse-free survival of early-stage breast cancer patients (n=82) who were CTC negative (n=66) or positive (n=16) at diagnosis. CTC-positive patients had a significantly poorer relapse-free survival than CTC-negative patients (univariate hazard ratio=4.72; 95% CI: 1.52–14.66; log rank test P=0.003). The number of patients at risk at each time point (months) are indicated for the CTC-negative (black) and CTC-positive (grey) groups. Abbreviations: CTC-positive or CTC-negative=positive or negative circulating tumour cell status according to quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) score; FU=follow-up.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111197&req=5

fig2: Kaplan–Meier survival curve for relapse-free survival of early-stage breast cancer patients (n=82) who were CTC negative (n=66) or positive (n=16) at diagnosis. CTC-positive patients had a significantly poorer relapse-free survival than CTC-negative patients (univariate hazard ratio=4.72; 95% CI: 1.52–14.66; log rank test P=0.003). The number of patients at risk at each time point (months) are indicated for the CTC-negative (black) and CTC-positive (grey) groups. Abbreviations: CTC-positive or CTC-negative=positive or negative circulating tumour cell status according to quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) score; FU=follow-up.
Mentions: Despite the relatively short follow-up period of this prospective study, CTC status at the time of diagnosis as determined by our assay was a significant predictor of relapse-free survival, with a hazard ratio of 4.72 (95% CI: 1.52–14.66, P=0.003; Figure 2 and Table 4). Importantly, multivariate analysis demonstrated that CTC status at the time of diagnosis was a significant and independent predictor of relapse-free survival (multivariate Cox regression, multivariate hazard ratio=5.13, P=0.006, 95% CI: 1.62–16.31; Table 5). The 4-year relapse-free survival rates were 92 and 69% for CTC-negative and CTC-positive patients, respectively (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The CTC detection was performed using ErbB2/EpCAM immunomagnetic tumour cell enrichment followed by multimarker quantitative PCR (QPCR).The specificity was 100%.The median follow-up time was 51 months (range: 17-60).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Experimental Therapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: The detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) has been linked with poor prognosis in advanced breast cancer. Relatively few studies have been undertaken to study the clinical relevance of CTCs in early-stage breast cancer.

Methods: In a prospective study, we evaluated CTCs in the peripheral blood of 82 early-stage breast cancer patients. Control groups consisted of 16 advanced breast cancer patients and 45 healthy volunteers. The CTC detection was performed using ErbB2/EpCAM immunomagnetic tumour cell enrichment followed by multimarker quantitative PCR (QPCR). The CTC status and common clinicopathological factors were correlated to relapse-free, breast cancer-related and overall survival.

Results: Circulating tumour cells were detected in 16 of 82 (20%) patients with early-stage breast cancer and in 13 out of 16 (81%) with advanced breast cancer. The specificity was 100%. The median follow-up time was 51 months (range: 17-60). The CTC positivity in early-stage breast cancer patients resulted in significantly poorer relapse-free survival (log rank test: P=0.003) and was an independent predictor of relapse-free survival (multivariate hazard ratio=5.13, P=0.006, 95% CI: 1.62-16.31).

Conclusion: The detection of CTCs in peripheral blood of early-stage breast cancer patients provided prognostic information for relapse-free survival.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus