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Facial emotion and identity processing development in 5- to 15-year-old children.

Johnston PJ, Kaufman J, Bajic J, Sercombe A, Michie PT, Karayanidis F - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: Additionally, studies that examine emotional face processing in older children do not distinguish development in emotion and identity face processing from more generic age-related cognitive improvement.Ninety-two children aged 5-15 years and a new group of 24 young adults completed these three matching tasks.More importantly, in older children, development of facial emotion discrimination ability lagged behind that of facial identity discrimination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of York York, UK.

ABSTRACT
Most developmental studies of emotional face processing to date have focused on infants and very young children. Additionally, studies that examine emotional face processing in older children do not distinguish development in emotion and identity face processing from more generic age-related cognitive improvement. In this study, we developed a paradigm that measures processing of facial expression in comparison to facial identity and complex visual stimuli. The three matching tasks were developed (i.e., facial emotion matching, facial identity matching, and butterfly wing matching) to include stimuli of similar level of discriminability and to be equated for task difficulty in earlier samples of young adults. Ninety-two children aged 5-15 years and a new group of 24 young adults completed these three matching tasks. Young children were highly adept at the butterfly wing task relative to their performance on both face-related tasks. More importantly, in older children, development of facial emotion discrimination ability lagged behind that of facial identity discrimination.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of same and different stimulus pairs from each of the three tasks.
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Figure 1: Examples of same and different stimulus pairs from each of the three tasks.

Mentions: The final stimulus set for this task included 32 faces of Caucasian actors (19 females) depicting a neutral facial expression from the University of Stirling face database (http://pics.stir.ac.uk/cgi-bin/PICS/New/pics.cgi). The battery included three exemplars of the same person including two different full frontal views and one 3/4 frontal view. As the full frontal views of the same person tended to be very easily identified as “same,” we also included pairings of 4/4 and 3/4 pictures for both same and different face pairings. It was thought that this would require some level of mental manipulation, broadly equivalent to that required for mentally rotating left and right or landscape and portrait butterfly wings or comparing facial expressions across different people. Stimuli were 12.5 cm × 16.5 cm black and white images shown against a black background. The 32 stimuli included 14 pairs of full frontal views, 15 pairs of full and 3/4 frontal views, and 3 pairs of 3/4 frontals views. The set comprised of 16 pairs of same and 16 pairs of different individuals paired for gender. Same pairings included different views of the same person. Different pairings were selected based on similarity ratings from the pilot studies and so that the two faces were matched for age, gender, and hairstyle. Participants were asked to respond to the question “Are these two photos of the same person?” (Figure 1).


Facial emotion and identity processing development in 5- to 15-year-old children.

Johnston PJ, Kaufman J, Bajic J, Sercombe A, Michie PT, Karayanidis F - Front Psychol (2011)

Examples of same and different stimulus pairs from each of the three tasks.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111136&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of same and different stimulus pairs from each of the three tasks.
Mentions: The final stimulus set for this task included 32 faces of Caucasian actors (19 females) depicting a neutral facial expression from the University of Stirling face database (http://pics.stir.ac.uk/cgi-bin/PICS/New/pics.cgi). The battery included three exemplars of the same person including two different full frontal views and one 3/4 frontal view. As the full frontal views of the same person tended to be very easily identified as “same,” we also included pairings of 4/4 and 3/4 pictures for both same and different face pairings. It was thought that this would require some level of mental manipulation, broadly equivalent to that required for mentally rotating left and right or landscape and portrait butterfly wings or comparing facial expressions across different people. Stimuli were 12.5 cm × 16.5 cm black and white images shown against a black background. The 32 stimuli included 14 pairs of full frontal views, 15 pairs of full and 3/4 frontal views, and 3 pairs of 3/4 frontals views. The set comprised of 16 pairs of same and 16 pairs of different individuals paired for gender. Same pairings included different views of the same person. Different pairings were selected based on similarity ratings from the pilot studies and so that the two faces were matched for age, gender, and hairstyle. Participants were asked to respond to the question “Are these two photos of the same person?” (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Additionally, studies that examine emotional face processing in older children do not distinguish development in emotion and identity face processing from more generic age-related cognitive improvement.Ninety-two children aged 5-15 years and a new group of 24 young adults completed these three matching tasks.More importantly, in older children, development of facial emotion discrimination ability lagged behind that of facial identity discrimination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of York York, UK.

ABSTRACT
Most developmental studies of emotional face processing to date have focused on infants and very young children. Additionally, studies that examine emotional face processing in older children do not distinguish development in emotion and identity face processing from more generic age-related cognitive improvement. In this study, we developed a paradigm that measures processing of facial expression in comparison to facial identity and complex visual stimuli. The three matching tasks were developed (i.e., facial emotion matching, facial identity matching, and butterfly wing matching) to include stimuli of similar level of discriminability and to be equated for task difficulty in earlier samples of young adults. Ninety-two children aged 5-15 years and a new group of 24 young adults completed these three matching tasks. Young children were highly adept at the butterfly wing task relative to their performance on both face-related tasks. More importantly, in older children, development of facial emotion discrimination ability lagged behind that of facial identity discrimination.

No MeSH data available.