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Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children.

Zaroo MI, Sheikh BA, Wani AH, Darzi MA, Mir M, Dar H, Baba Peerzada UF, Zargar HR - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks.Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents.Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children.

Materials and methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was "Kangri" burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers.

Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents.

Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wounds covered with preputial grafts
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Figure 5: Wounds covered with preputial grafts

Mentions: None of the patients had graft loss, and all wounds healed within 2 weeks. The stretched out preputial graft was sufficient to cover the defects after contracture release in two as well as three fingers [Figure 5]. The largest size of the graft used was 6.5 × 4 cm [Table 1]. The children were regularly followed up. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. During the 18-month to 6-year follow-up, all grafts were stable, pliable, and no patients presented with significant graft contracture [Figure 6]. The hand functions were normal, though hyperpigmentation of the grafted skin was seen in three cases, which was accepted well by the parents. Pigmentary changes were less in mucosal portion of the grafts as compared to the skin portion. There was no donor site complication.


Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children.

Zaroo MI, Sheikh BA, Wani AH, Darzi MA, Mir M, Dar H, Baba Peerzada UF, Zargar HR - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

Wounds covered with preputial grafts
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111128&req=5

Figure 5: Wounds covered with preputial grafts
Mentions: None of the patients had graft loss, and all wounds healed within 2 weeks. The stretched out preputial graft was sufficient to cover the defects after contracture release in two as well as three fingers [Figure 5]. The largest size of the graft used was 6.5 × 4 cm [Table 1]. The children were regularly followed up. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. During the 18-month to 6-year follow-up, all grafts were stable, pliable, and no patients presented with significant graft contracture [Figure 6]. The hand functions were normal, though hyperpigmentation of the grafted skin was seen in three cases, which was accepted well by the parents. Pigmentary changes were less in mucosal portion of the grafts as compared to the skin portion. There was no donor site complication.

Bottom Line: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks.Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents.Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children.

Materials and methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was "Kangri" burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers.

Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents.

Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus