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Effect of static wrist position on grip strength.

Bhardwaj P, Nayak SS, Kiswar AM, Sabapathy SR - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study.For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion.Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic, Hand, Burns and Reconstructive Microsurgery, Ganga Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Grip strength after wrist arthrodesis is reported to be significantly less than normal. One of the reasons suggested for this decrease in grip strength is that the arthrodesis was performed in a suboptimal position. However, there is no consensus on the ideal position of wrist fusion. There is a paucity of studies evaluating the effect of various fixed positions of the wrist on grip strength and therefore, there is no guide regarding the ideal position of wrist fusion. The authors' aim was to determine the grip strength in various fixed positions of the wrist and subsequently to find out in which position of wrist fusion the grip strength would be maximal.

Materials and methods: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study. For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion. The grip strength in all the participants was measured bilaterally, first without a splint and then with each splint sequentially.

Results: The average grip strength without the splint was 34.3 kg for right and 32.3 kg for the left hand. Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted. The maximum average grip strength with a splint on was recorded at 45 degrees of extension (27.9 kg for right and 26.3 kg for left side). There was a gradual increase in the grip strength with increase in wrist extension but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). The grip strength was significantly less in flexed position of the wrist (P < 0.001).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in grip strength with wrist position at left hand
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Figure 4: Change in grip strength with wrist position at left hand

Mentions: The average grip strength in various wrist positions is shown in Figures 3 and 4. The average grip strength without splint was 34.3 kg at right hand and 32.3 kg at left hand. Grip strength reduced by about 19–25% when wrist was splinted, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001). Maximum average grip strength with the splint on was recorded when the wrist was held in 45 degrees of extension (27.9 kg on right side and 26.3 kg on left side). However, this maximum grip strength with the splint on was only 81% of the unconstrained grip strength without a splint. There was a gradual increase in the grip strength with increase in wrist extension (in the range analyzed in this study i.e. till 45 degrees) but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). Grip strength in wrist flexion was only 13.9 kg on right side and 13 kg on left side, which is approximately 60% less than the normal grip strength (P < 0.001). The restricted grip strength in flexed position of the wrist was only half of the restricted grip strength in extension.


Effect of static wrist position on grip strength.

Bhardwaj P, Nayak SS, Kiswar AM, Sabapathy SR - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

Change in grip strength with wrist position at left hand
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111126&req=5

Figure 4: Change in grip strength with wrist position at left hand
Mentions: The average grip strength in various wrist positions is shown in Figures 3 and 4. The average grip strength without splint was 34.3 kg at right hand and 32.3 kg at left hand. Grip strength reduced by about 19–25% when wrist was splinted, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001). Maximum average grip strength with the splint on was recorded when the wrist was held in 45 degrees of extension (27.9 kg on right side and 26.3 kg on left side). However, this maximum grip strength with the splint on was only 81% of the unconstrained grip strength without a splint. There was a gradual increase in the grip strength with increase in wrist extension (in the range analyzed in this study i.e. till 45 degrees) but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). Grip strength in wrist flexion was only 13.9 kg on right side and 13 kg on left side, which is approximately 60% less than the normal grip strength (P < 0.001). The restricted grip strength in flexed position of the wrist was only half of the restricted grip strength in extension.

Bottom Line: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study.For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion.Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic, Hand, Burns and Reconstructive Microsurgery, Ganga Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Grip strength after wrist arthrodesis is reported to be significantly less than normal. One of the reasons suggested for this decrease in grip strength is that the arthrodesis was performed in a suboptimal position. However, there is no consensus on the ideal position of wrist fusion. There is a paucity of studies evaluating the effect of various fixed positions of the wrist on grip strength and therefore, there is no guide regarding the ideal position of wrist fusion. The authors' aim was to determine the grip strength in various fixed positions of the wrist and subsequently to find out in which position of wrist fusion the grip strength would be maximal.

Materials and methods: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study. For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion. The grip strength in all the participants was measured bilaterally, first without a splint and then with each splint sequentially.

Results: The average grip strength without the splint was 34.3 kg for right and 32.3 kg for the left hand. Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted. The maximum average grip strength with a splint on was recorded at 45 degrees of extension (27.9 kg for right and 26.3 kg for left side). There was a gradual increase in the grip strength with increase in wrist extension but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). The grip strength was significantly less in flexed position of the wrist (P < 0.001).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus